World War Ii

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Sacred Folly: on Romain Gary’s The Kites and Promise at Dawn by J.W. McCormack
Romain Gary Banner

A rediscovered novel and memoir depict a character we are lucky to have on the page. In life he would mortify us.

Sculpting Space: Ruth Asawa at David Zwirner by Osman Can Yerebakan
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Mixing ardor and ethereality.

Signor Hoffman by Eduardo Halfon

From the train I could look out onto the infinite blue of the sea. I was still exhausted, wakeful from the overnight transatlantic flight to Rome, but looking out at the sea, that Mediterranean sea that was so infinite and so blue, made me forget it all, even myself. I don’t know why.

Here Comes Kitty: A Comic Opera by Richard Kraft
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Amid the cacophony of collage, there is also, here, a baseline of story marching on: again and again the soldiers, the trucks. Isn’t it a natural impulse to want to follow that line? 

Pierre Guyotat by Noura Wedell
Pierre Guyotat

The French writer speaks to his translator about his latest autobiographical novel to appear in English. Titled In the Deep, it deals with the link between desire and his early literary output, as well as the effect of his Catholic upbringing and World War II on his imagination.

Susanna Moore by Kurt Andersen
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“Crises always present a moral dilemma—how are we to behave virtuously, and still manage to survive?”

Wie hiesst Himmler’s Brain? by Ashley McNelis
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Wie hiesst Himmler’s Brain?? Ashley McNelis on Laurent Binet’s HHhH.

Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence by Clinton Krute
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The vast rewards offered by the films of Nagisa Oshima, exemplified by the strange, unclassifiable Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence, are just beginning to be appreciated in America.

Dave Tompkins’s How to Wreck a Nice Beach: The Vocoder from World War II to Hip-Hop, The Machine Speaks by Douglas Singleton
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A review of How to Wreck a Nice Beach, a new book that tells the history of that most mysterious of musical instruments, the vocodor.

Heimrad Bäcker’s Transcript by Vanessa Place
Article 4826 Backer Copyright Linschinger

Adorno wrote that there could be no lyric poetry after Auschwitz; Duchamp made art an afterword.

My Grandfather’s Disintegration by Antonio Ungar

This First Proof contains the story “My Grandfather’s Disintegration” by Antonio Ungar, translated by Katherine Silver.

The Cats of Mirikitani by Nell McClister
​Jimmy Tsutomu Mirikitani 04

Even more extraordinary than the putative subject of Linda Hattendorf’s debut documentary, an elderly homeless artist, is the fact that Hattendorf started aiming her camera at him long before September 11, 2001. 

Péter Nádas by Davis Kovacs
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A scholar not only of literature, but of culture, horticulture, and above all the human body and its communications, Nádas presents a picture of temperament and elegance in the great tradition of the European intellectual.

Lore Segal by Han Ong
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“The one thing you can rely on in any situation is that the feelings you’re going to have are not the ones you think you’re supposed to have.”

Bernard-Henri Lévy by Frederic Tuten
Jerome Charyn by Frederic Tuten
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Both first-rate novelists, Frederic Tuten and Jerome Charyn grew up in the Bronx, meeting as teenagers at the home of Fay Levine, the Bronx’s own Elizabeth Taylor. The two reminisce after the release of Charyn’s novel The Green Lantern.

Release and Capture by Fionn Meade
Jorge Volpi by Martin Solares
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Far from the magic realism of conventional Latin American narrative, Jorge Volpi’s novel In Search of Klingsor ( En busca de Klingsor; Seix Barral, 1999) relates a historical fiction set in the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University and in postwar Germany under the Allied occupation. 

Shohei Imamura’s Dr. Akagi by Lawrence Chua
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Shohei Imamura’s 25th film, Dr. Akagi, is a lovely mess of jazzy comedy, kink, and apocalypse that he has declared to be his last movie. 

Haruki Murakami’s Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Robert Polito
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From his earliest spare fictions, Hear the Wind Sing and Norwegian Wood, through his recent, steadily more baroque and textured novels, A Wild Sheep ChaseHard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, and Dance Dance Dance, Haruki Murakami nudged contemporary realism into fable…

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