Suburban Life

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The Babysitter at Rest by Jen George

Winner of BOMB’s 2015 Fiction Contest, selected by Sheila Heti

Details Inside by T Cooper

The sight of a handsome girl in too tight cut-offs sent the reels in Travis’s slot machine brain scrambling. 

Mrs. Job in Connecticut by George Robert Minkoff

Why it interested me is because it happened.

Rona Yefman by michel auder
Tent 300 Bomb 12X8 Body

Uncanny, maybe. Troublemakers for sure. Between reality and fiction, Rona Yefman’s Let It Bleed brings us the flawless collaboration between photographer and actor, in this case, the artist and her sibling Gil. 

Fiction for Driving: An excerpt from S P R A W L by Danielle Dutton
Danielle Dutton

In the eighth installment in BOMB’s Fiction for Driving Across America series, Dannielle Dutton reads an excerpt from her novel S P R A W L, published by Siglio Press, which appeared in the Summer Issue #112 of BOMB’s literary supplement, First Proof.

An Excerpt from S P R A W L by Danielle Dutton

I walk through streets and look in windows to witness cheerfully painted walls and vertical lamps, high technical quality and surround-sound, mystery, beauty, fry baskets, fried chicken legs, joy sticks, shelves, ovens, beans.

And Here and There, a Kiss by Paula Brancato
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“Even the fireflies linger” in Paula Brancato’s poem “And Here and There, a Kiss”; and don’t we all wish that the summer months would linger on as well? This season’s end is upon us once again, and I find myself stubbornly grasping on before it slips away into fall. Though “And Here and There, a Kiss” is more than a poem about a season, it captures the simultaneous tragedy and magic of that simple, suburban summer. It speaks to that wistful youth of growing up and those carefree days that eventually slip away from us all.

– Galina Arnaut

Patriots by Patrick Dacey

Right around the time the war on terror began, I thought, Does Donna really need so many friggin’ flags? 

Two Poems by Tom Healy
Where the F Stops by Alexandra Enders

On a freakishly warm Saturday last November, a day when children pulled out their sand pails and last summer’s shorts, and overdressed parents stripped off layer after layer of their own clothes, revealing pale, hairy bodies meant to be concealed at this time of year,

Bill Owens by Larry Sultan

In Owens’s world the insides of refrigerators and closets, a lipstick-red toilet seat and well-stocked pantry drawers also warranted portraiture. What’s astonishing is not that Bill saw these things, knew these suburban families and inspected their domiciles, but that he was attentive and crazy enough to think that this was the stuff of photographs.

Billy Goats by Jill McCorkle

This First Proof contains the story “Billy Goats.”

American Children by Joanne Jacobson

This First Proof contains the story “American Children.”

A.M. Homes’s Music for Torching by Benjamin Taylor

A novelist’s job is to get “dirty with the dirty,” W.H. Auden once said. It is a dictum A.M. Homes adheres to, with formidable results.

Gregory Crewdson by Bradford Morrow
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Gregory Crewdson’s photographs of expansive dioramas recall Duchamp, Emerson, and the American suburbs. The documentary Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters is in limited release now.

Jane Dickson by Sylvère Lotringer
Jane Dickson 01

Dickson’s paintings documented the isolation and the life of Times Square pre-vamp. She and Sylvère Lotringer discuss the suburbs, demolition derby and becoming American.

Rick Moody’s Purple America by Betsy Sussler
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Purple America has the acid overtones of Hendrix’s “Purple Rain” coupled with the rollicking control of a writer who knows exactly what he’s about.

Bruiser by Richard House

This First Proof contains an excerpt from the novel “Bruiser.”

George Walker by Stephen Haff
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Stephen Haff has directed the American premieres of Canada’s most respected playwright, George Walker. Often compared to Sam Shepard, Walker creates working-class characters who walk the edge of comedy and despair.

A.M. Homes  by Gregory Crewdson
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Set against Robert Frank’s Cocksucker Blues, A.M. Homes and artist Gregory Crewdson scrape the layers off suburban homes, revealing the surreal, the pornographic, and the psycho-sexual desires in her novel, The End of Alice.

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