Site-Specific Works

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Meta-Instruments: Lea Bertucci and Noah Wall
Noah Wall And Lea Bertucci Album Covers Bomb Magazine

The sound artists discuss their recent site-specific projects and the revolutionary potential of reclaiming public space through sound.

Meta-Instruments: Lea Bertucci and Noah Wall
Noah Wall And Lea Bertucci Album Covers Bomb Magazine

The sound artists discuss their recent site-specific projects and the revolutionary potential of reclaiming public space through sound.

Investigating Site: Corin Hewitt Interviewed by Joshua Simon
Corin Hewitt1

Installations that explore their larger contexts.

Mind As Object: Alicja Kwade Interviewed by Melissa Bianca Amore
Alicja Kwade1

A solar system on a rooftop.

Seeing the Obvious, Revealing the Hidden: Yanira Collado in Conversation with Onajide Shabaka
Collado1

Two artists share an interest in navigating history and geography.

Context Contingent: Ghislaine Leung Interviewed by Alan Ruiz
Ghislaine Leung1

The two artists discuss public space and the means of circulation in Leung’s recent works. 

Portfolio by Alan Ruiz
Ruiz2

What does form perform?

William Pope.L Navigates the Flint Waterways by Jennifer Junkermeier
Popel1

Not fit for human consumption.

Ethan Greenbaum by Andrianna Campbell
Greenbaum Tyvek 1

“It’s nice when you can make connections in hindsight. Your life feels like chaos and then you realize that there are patterns.”

Tom Burr by Alan Ruiz
Burr Tom 01 Bomb 134

“Some people are happy calling me an artist, others a Conceptual or post-Conceptual artist, others say sculptor, and others use a string of modifiers. Someone suggested once that I was simply performing these categories, which I like.”

Portfolio by Matthew C. Wilson

Interspecies/specie communication.

Shannon Ebner and Zoe Leonard
Zoe Leonard 0012

Both artists overturn photographic conventions to slow down our reading of physical and verbal landscapes. Their exchange touches on the retina, the sun, and camera obscura.

HEAT: Rashid Johnson’s Dutchman
Dutchman

In a new staging of Amiri Baraka’s one-act play, the audience and performers alike are tasked with endurance.

Above and Below: Gordon Matta-Clark by Lytle Shaw
Matta Clark 1 1000 Body

The 17th-century townhouses that Gordon Matta-Clark and his friends chipped away at in Conical Intersect (1975) did not collapse immediately—like, say, flimsy clapboard ranch styles built where neighborhood site plans had been rushed and mistaken.

Lauri Stallings by Andrew Alexander

The artist on performing motherhood and marriage in her new video The Breath We Took and why “write what you know” is limiting advice.

Charles Simonds’s Absence by Stephanie Weber

Charles Simonds’s New York Dwellings and his mysterious absence from contemporary discourse.

Tony Feher by Saul Ostrow
Feher 01 Body

Ostrow visits Feher at his Bronx studio, where he muses about his past, contemplates his future, and pinpoints the exact moment when he discovered to be an artist meant to believe “I was right, even when I was wrong.”

Sheila Pepe by Ryan Johnson
Pepe 3 New Body

One of Sheila Pepe’s choice materials has been the ordinary shoelace, so present in our everyday lives as to be almost invisible. Tying your shoelaces is a ritual shared by most and may hold an exceptional significance for an artist based in New York, this great city of the pedestrian.

Seeing Ian Hamilton Finlay’s Poetics by Nick Thurston

In my view, all of my work, in all of its forms, from the simplest concrete poems to the war with Strathclyde Region, has been based on an aspiration for ordered simplicity. (In such a light do I see Saint-Just and Robespierre; in such a light, equally, do I decry Danton.)

—Letter to Francis Edeline, 2 October 1988

BOMB Global: Toronto by Rebecca Melnyk
Flightpath Toronto

On October 1, millions of people in Toronto ventured outside their homes to experience the 6th annual Nuit Blanche. Rebecca Melnyk spoke to the curators about the multi-city event and the role of public art.

At Work: Allison Weisberg and Maia Murphy Take Recess by Legacy Russell

Who needs Chelsea? With Recess painting the town, contemporary art is approachable, engaging, interactive, and downright unassuming. Is it possible? Legacy Russell made a visit to 41 Grand to find out who’s at work and what keeps the gears turning at this storefront oasis.

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