Sexuality

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The Form Vampire: An Interview with Carmen Maria Machado by Liza St. James
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“Our bodies are graveyards of cells, the source of art, inherently finite, constantly decaying.”

Spit It Out: Eliza Hittman’s Beach Rats by Daniel Lefferts
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Sexual panic in South Brooklyn

Lidia Yuknavitch by Porochista Khakpour

Writing with the body as her touchstone, the novelist channels a woman warrior in The Book of Joan.

André Aciman by Gary M. Kramer
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“Obsession and fantasy, like desire and fear, happen in the mind… the most powerful, fixated erotic organ known to man.”

Auteur Gone Wild by Elina Alter
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On the risqué drawings of Sergei Eisenstein

Eddie Peake’s Head by David Everitt Howe
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Inaugurating Deitch’s return to SoHo, Head proved to be little more than sexual provocation.

Marcy by Domenick Ammirati

Around this time I became a frequent visitor to a sex-ad bulletin board. Real-life meetups were the focal point. 

Mike Goodlett by Ben Durham
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Homebody, the title of Mike Goodlett’s first New York solo exhibition, playfully refers to his life of relative seclusion in rural Kentucky.

Becca Blackwell’s They, Themself and Schmerm by Amber Power
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It’s Corey Haim here—‘80s heartthrob, teen idol, and tragic girlish boy next door. What’s up, Schmerm?

Naja Marie Aidt by Mieke Chew
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“Women in Denmark should be both women and men at the same time, but ‘men’ and ‘women’—what does that mean?”

Oleg Dubson by Charles Krezell
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“Artists as pornographers. It all became clear.”

Judith Bernstein by Sofia Leiby
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“In my work, there’s an awful lot of screaming to be heard.”

Justin Vivian Bond by Joy Episalla
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Bond keeps expanding a performative repertoire that’s equally personal and political. On the occasion of V’s gallery exhibit in London, Episalla queries the self-designated “trans-genre artist.”

Leigh Ledare by Chris Kraus
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Leigh Ledare’s projects involve interpersonal triangulations in which the camera plays a crucial role and all parties, viewers included, are implicated. Upon A.R.T. Press’s publication of a book-length dialogue between him and Rhea Anastas, Ledare revisits recent works with novelist Chris Kraus.

Dorothy Iannone’s You Who Read Me With Passion Now Must Forever Be My Friends, Edited by Lisa Pearson, with Essay By Trinie Dalton by Christine Wertheim
Dorothy Iannone

What’s in a name? Take Douglas Sirk’s film Imitation of Life or Christina Stead’s novel For Love Alone—these are exemplary names, for they give precise definition to their objects, the works they denote.

Tsai Ming-liang by Gary M. Kramer
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Creation, bathrooms, and Buddhism.

Felix Bernstein & Cecilia Corrigan
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“I don’t think being a cynical, academically oriented deconstructor should stop one from being a wild and crazy performer.”

Desiree Akhavan by Steve Macfarlane
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Exiled to adulthood.

Beau Rice by Aiden Arata
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Text messaging, parasexual literature, and psychiatry in drag.

Pierre Guyotat by Noura Wedell
Pierre Guyotat

The French writer speaks to his translator about his latest autobiographical novel to appear in English. Titled In the Deep, it deals with the link between desire and his early literary output, as well as the effect of his Catholic upbringing and World War II on his imagination.

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