Protest

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Bouchra Khalili’s The Radical Ally by Sophie Kovel
Bouchra Khalili, The Radical Ally

In February 1970, the Black Panther Party (BPP) sought political support from the French dissident writer Jean Genet, after his play The Blacks, which had recently traveled to New York, suggested he might be an ally.

Bouchra Khalili’s The Radical Ally by Sophie Kovel
Bouchra Khalili, The Radical Ally

In February 1970, the Black Panther Party (BPP) sought political support from the French dissident writer Jean Genet, after his play The Blacks, which had recently traveled to New York, suggested he might be an ally.

Ice by Jenny Wu

Of all my clients, I liked Wen Changbao because he never touched me. I just listened to him. For a while I thought of myself as his dog, simply because he was my first friend.

Visceral Improvisation: Poncili Creación Interviewed by Ruby Brunton
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The Puerto Rican punk-DIY performance collective on challenging institutional norms for making theater.

Tent Music: 75 Dollar Bill’s I Was Real Reviewed by Michael Blair
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“You could dance to it, mourn with it, revel in it, or march alongside it.”

Jaque Fragua and Brad Kahlhamer
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Two artists drawing from punk, graffiti, and traditional Native American aesthetics, talk about protest art and the notion of the “Post-Smithsonian delinquent.”

Stephen Maing’s Crime + Punishment by Stephanie E. Goodalle
Crime And Punishment Credit Stephen Maing Final

In the aftermath of Eric Garner’s murder, a Black protester shouts at a group of cops, “Black officers, Puerto Rican officers, nobody likes you! Nobody. You are hated. You’re hated in New York and throughout the United States. This isn’t ignorance. This is anger, officer!” This scene from Stephen Maing’s character-driven documentary Crime + Punishment is another testimony to the rampant racial inequity in the United States.

One Piece: Clearly Confused by Natalie Baxter
Natalie Baxter Clearly Confused

The artist talks about the genesis, composition, and execution of a recently completed work.

New York Diary by Édouard Louis
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The French writer Édouard Louis recorded his days in New York, around the time of the American release of his novel The End of Eddy. The following entries originally appeared in French in the June 6, 2017, edition of Les Inrockuptibles.

Staring Back, Staring Out: An Interview with Jillian Weise by Jessie Male
Jillian Weise Banner

“I originally published this in 2007 thinking, Oh this is a fine book, but I will be joined by a whole lot of amputee writers, and they are going to be here any minute. I’m still waiting.”

Ieva Misevičiūtė by Melanie Bonajo
Ieva Miseviciute Bomb Magazine 01

A performance artist who grew up in the circus uses clowning, street dance, and butoh in playful and provocative combinations.

Kayapó Chief Tuire by Pinar Yolaçan
Kayapo Chief Tuire Bomb 1

“I won’t open my palm for those wanting to dominate.”

A Punch in 4/4 Time by Valerie Tevere & Angel Nevarez
110705131 03272017 Angel Nevarez And Valerie Tevere Bomb 01

On the day of POTUS 45’s inauguration, alt-right front man Richard Spencer was punched in the face during an interview for Australian television.

Call to Witness by Nico Wheadon
James Baldwin Bomb 1

Raoul Peck’s I Am Not Your Negro testifies that James Baldwin’s embattled America is still our own.

Dispatch from Standing Rock #4 by Ati Maier

Brooklyn-based artist Ati Maier is currently in North Dakota, where she has joined the Standing Rock Sioux in their demonstrations against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Dispatch from Standing Rock #3 by Ati Maier

Brooklyn-based artist Ati Maier is currently in North Dakota, where she has joined the Standing Rock Sioux in their demonstrations against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Dispatch from Standing Rock #2 by Ati Maier

Brooklyn-based artist Ati Maier is currently in North Dakota, where she has joined the Standing Rock Sioux in their demonstrations against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Dispatch from Standing Rock #1 by Ati Maier

Brooklyn-based artist Ati Maier is currently in North Dakota, where she has joined the Standing Rock Sioux in their demonstrations against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Embodied Absence by Claire Barliant
Cecilia Vicuna 01

Chilean protest art of the 1970s proves timely.

Breanne Fahs by Liz Kinnamon
Valerie Solanas

Madness, SCUM Manifesto, and Valerie Solanas—history’s most famous lipstick misandrist.

Paulo Bruscky by Antonio Sergio Bessa
Paolo Bruscky 1

Paulo Bruscky came of age as an artist during the military takeover of Brazil in the 1960s and ’70s. In his native Recife, he developed a body of work for the dissemination of messages—through mail art, newspaper ads, flyers, and public interventions.

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