Portraiture

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Portfolio by Eva Woolridge
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Embracing divine identity through photographic portraiture.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer by Katherine Cooper​
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A painter talks about portraits as love letters, the poetry of country music, addiction and compulsion, drawing out painful archetypes, and finding both resentment and dignity in daily life.

Peter Funch’s 42nd and Vanderbilt by Gideon Jacobs
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Photographer Peter Funch’s new book, 42nd and Vanderbilt, is a clever meditation on the commute, but more specifically, it’s a tightly designed experiment about routine.

Collective Enthusiasm: An Interview with Agnès Varda & JR by Gary M. Kramer
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“We never thought, ‘We have to give them dignity.’ We thought we have to give them empathy.”

Nina Katchadourian by Mónica de la Torre​
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Embracing boredom and creative constraints, Katchadourian tells of in-flight artwork and other conceptual projects.

Alessandra Sanguinetti’s Le Gendarme sur la Colline by Gideon Jacobs
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Old iconography in a new France

Wolfgang Tillmans’s 2017 by Orit Gat
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The smallest of details, writ large

Project by An-My Lê

In the spring of 2015, An-My Lê was invited by film director Gary Ross to photograph on the set of Free State of Jones, his period war film inspired by the life of Newton Knight, a Mississippi farmer and Southern Unionist who led an armed revolt against the Confederacy in 1864. 

Alice Neel’s Uptown by Zack Hatfield
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Portraits of Harlem before gentrification

Roe Ethridge by Tim Griffin
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Humor, commerce, and family play big roles in Ethridge’s conceptual photography.

Enacting Stillness by Kay Larson

From mindful Minimalism to inaction as activism.

Njideka Akunyili Crosby by Erica Ando
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From Lagos to LA, a young painter’s images resonate with meaning, both personal and political.

James Esber by David Geers
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While the art-world pendulum predictably swings back and forth between a taste for abstraction and an embrace of figuration, some artists remain steadfast in their pursuits. Such is the case with James Esber, whose work has long sought to merge these seemingly opposed tendencies.

Project by Leanne Shapton
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MOLLY, MERCY, MADELINE,
MYRA, MAGGIE, MEREDITH,
MARLEY, MAGDA, MARGARET,
MINDY, MILLIE, MAGDALA,
MYRNA, MOIRA, MARIANNE,
MARLA, MAURA, MARIGOLD,
MEGHAN, MARY, MILLICENT,
MAITE, MAPLE, MITZI.

End Page by Jonathan Horowitz
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This work by Jonathan Horowitz was produced as a poster for the Jewish Museum exhibition Take Me (I’m Yours), on view September 16, 2016–February 5, 2017.

Brandan “Bmike” Odums by Zachary Lazar
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After Hurricane Katrina, Brandan “Bmike” Odums realized that the graffiti he and other artists were making in the abandoned buildings around New Orleans had an inherent political value, not just because of the subject matter (though Odums himself had always had an affinity for depicting civil-rights icons) but also because creating art in those depopulated spaces foregrounded their meaning, calling attention to what they had once been, what they had been allowed to become, and why.

Patrick Angus in Arkansas
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“A kind of home museum, starting with the garage.”

Portfolio by Adriana Minoliti

Trans-Pictorial CYBORGS / UTOPIAN Multimedia Spaces

Wendy Ewald by Esther Allen
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“I want the people I collaborate with to understand that they can move a way from the realities they’ve been placed into, that they can create a reality.”

Portfolio by Asger Carlsen
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HESTER

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