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Guillermo Calderón’s Villa by Tom Sellar
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It takes a rare kind of playwright to evoke the head-spinning contradictions in our national political psyches.

Dmitry Krymov by John Freedman
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“I asked my students for the image of the essence of tenderness. One girl brought in a small, silver plate with a bunch of grapes neatly laid out on it. When I noticed she had stripped the skin off the grapes, I got goose bumps.”

Jackie Sibblies Drury’s Really by Ratik Asokan
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A play that updates European absurdist techniques to take aim at liberal America’s great existential troubles: race and gender.

Lisa Dwan & Walter Asmus by Michael Coffey
Lisa Dwan Walter Asmus Bomb 1

”I am not a human being up there, true, and I am not a woman. I’m consciousness.”

Lola Arias by Elianna Kan

“One is constantly working over what happened and constructing the future based on the past. So there’s no way of saying now we’re done with the past and it’s time to look for our future. No, there’s a direct continuity between these things.”

Tom Noonan by Sam Alper
Tom Noonan

Tom Noonan on plays becoming movies, musicians becoming actors, and fantasy becoming reality.

HEAT: Rashid Johnson’s Dutchman
Dutchman

In a new staging of Amiri Baraka’s one-act play, the audience and performers alike are tasked with endurance.

David Greenspan’s The Myopia and Other Plays by Anne Washburn
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David Greenspan’s plays are at once grotesque and beautiful; they pontificate on meta-theater and self-consciousness, while remaining familiar and intimate.

Rude Mechanicals by Eric Dyer
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Amy Herzog by Carolyn Cantor
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“I went through a period in my twenties when I really resented the pressure to be happy that I felt from my parents and from the world at large, because aspiring to be happy doesn’t always lead to the most interesting life.”

There’s No Ink by Himali Singh Soin
Uncle Vanya

The writing is on the wall in Annie Baker’s reimagining of Uncle Vanya at the Soho Rep.

Tom Murphy by Colm Tóibín
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“All art aspires toward music, so I try, as far as I can, to make a symphony out of the language.”

Ampersand: Mariah MacCarthy by Emerald Pellot
Ampersand

Emerald Pellot speaks with playwright Mariah MacCarthy about the writer’s latest play: Ampersand: A Romeo and Juliet Story, part of FringeNYC.

Jan Lauwers by Elizabeth LeCompte
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Belgian director and playwright Jan Lauwers of Needcompany in discussion with fellow dramatist Elizabeth LeCompte of The Wooster Group on the parallel lives of their respective companies and the upcoming performance of The Deer House at BAM.

Thomas Bradshaw by Margo Jefferson
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Jefferson describes Bradshaw’s plays as treacherous territories peopled with high-achieving suburbanites and professors gripped by sexual and racial manias. Their most dangerous quality: they act on pure id.

The Difficulty of Crossing a Field by Scott Shepherd
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I didn’t grow up going to the theater, so plays for me were instructions for imagining (or also, I gathered, enacting) bizarre performance events, and curious printing practices had arisen to reproduce this unwieldy information.

Richard Maxwell by John Kelsey
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“That question is not about the character that’s written on the page there. That question is about you. There’s a kind of compulsion when you’re acting to make it believable, to make it credible. That’s not my concern. That’s going to happen. Whatever happens will be real. It will be real in some fashion.” 

Afterword to the play Alice Invents a Little Game and Alice Always Wins by Nick Flynn

When asked what his plays were about, Harold Pinter once famously and facetiously replied that they were all about “the weasel under the cocktail cabinet.”

Kate Valk by David Salle & Sarah French
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“I worked at Shepherd-Pratt mental hospital, and I liked to take my name tag off and maybe be confused for one of the patients.”

Wallace Shawn’s The Fever
​Wallace Shawn

Wallace Shawn’s Traveler is sick with fever, wedged between the sink and the toilet in an unnamed hotel located in an undisclosed country after a civil war. Borges’s time labyrinth imbues the atmosphere;

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