Philosophy

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Marcus Steinweg by Yasmil Raymond
Steinweg Marcus 01

The German philosopher holds forth on love, diagrams, and his particular style of oration. His book Inconsistencies will appear in English this fall from MIT Press.

Jen Bervin and Dianna Frid
Dianna Frid 03 Bomb 137

Through sewing, weaving, and embroidery, two artists probe the boundaries between texts and textiles.

Sarah Ruden by Eric Banks
Chan Paul 01 Bomb 134

Hippias Minor is such a handy introduction to Socrates as a personality, to this method of argumentation, to the culture of Athens where you have all these hot-shot foreign speakers like Hippias coming in and making the intellectual fermentation even stronger.”

The Thinking Head by S.D. Chrostowska
Wardell Milan Bomb 1

The smaller the animal, the less the distance between being and its sensation. In this way, the smallest beings are closer to presence than us, who come face to face with being and do not sense it. 

Portfolio by Olivia Erlanger

There will come soft rains.

Jeremy M. Davies by Scott Esposito
Julio Gonzalez 1

“A very specific, peculiar sort of universe-in-a-bottle.”

Simon Critchley’s Memory Theatre by Nova Benway
Liam Gillick Combo

“Who speaks in the work of Samuel Beckett?” asks Simon Critchley in his probing 1998 essay on the nature of the Irish writer’s narrative voice.

Albert Serra by Steve Macfarlane
Albert Serra 01

Casanova, Dracula, and art in the age of digital filmmaking.

Etel Adnan by Lisa Robertson
Adnan 01

I took the morning TGV from Poitiers to Paris on January 15th to ask Etel Adnan a question. She was about to receive France’s highest cultural honor, the Ordre de Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres. Her collected writings are imminent with Nightboat Books, and she has been the late star of Kassel. 

Heidi Norton and Michael Marder by Monica Westin
​Heidi Norton 1

Artist Heidi Norton and philosopher Michael Marder discuss the ethics of plants and differentiate between “nature” and “ecology.”

Amy Sillman by R. H. Quaytman
Sillman 01

I don’t remember when Amy and I first met—it must have been in the mid ’90s. However, I do remember that she saved my life by being one of the few artists who genuinely seemed to admire and enjoy what I was doing at a time when my work was barely known.

Margarethe von Trotta and Barbara Sukowa by Sabine Russ
Hannah Arendt 01

Von Trotta and actress Barbara Sukowa discuss their history together, the role of radical women in Germany and their latest film, Hannah Arendt.

Andrew Hugill’s Pataphysics: A Useless Guide by Daniel Levin Becker
Edschoice Pataphysics Ubu Roi

Pataphysics: A Useless Guide, a theological pseudoscience, defines hand gestures as providing access to the divine, and others as blasphemy.

Eija-Liisa Ahtila by Cary Wolfe
Ahtila 8 Body

“Breaking up perspective has long been one of the central themes in my works.”

Deleuze: From A to Z by Rachel Kushner
Gilles Deleuze 01

An eight hour interview with Gilles Delueze was saved for release until after the philosopher’s death. The posthumous talk covers everything from A to Z. Literally.

Frédrique Bergholtz and Iberia Pérez’s (Mis)Reading Masquerades by Christopher Stackhouse
6  Masquerades 01

A collection of essays examining the cultural, social and political manifestations of both literal and metaphorical masquerade.

Olafur Eliasson by Chris Gilbert
Eliasson 03 Body

Conceptual art’s shift away from the traditional art object—sometimes dubiously referred to as “dematerialization”—was more or less an idée reçue in the late 1980s and early ’90s, when Olafur Eliasson was beginning to make art as a student at the Royal Academy of Arts in Copenhagen.

Michael Haneke by Lawrence Chua
Bomb Haneke Body

After seeing my first Michael Haneke film, I left the theater sick to my stomach. Perhaps this is not the most obvious compliment to pay a director, but there is a visceral effect to Haneke’s work that I would be remiss in not sharing.

Victor Pelevin by Leo Kropywiansky
Pelevin 01 Body

Dissolution of the totalitarian Soviet regime brought Russia democracy of an imperfect sort. But much of the euphoria of the early nineties has dissipated in the face of new realities.

Slavoj Žižek’s The Art of the Ridiculous Sublime: On David Lynch’s Lost Highway by Rachel Kushner

When I first saw David Lynch’s Lost Highway upon its theater release in 1998, I found myself seduced by what have become classic Lynchean touches: the opening sequence of bifurcated highway strip, its noirish titles, its lushly choreographed scenes and hearty use of the sexual and the grotesque—in sum, its unimpeachable stylishness. 

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