Performance Art

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Gender Trouble in Queer Paradise by Tavia Nyong'o
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Future St. is set in an America in which homosexuality has triumphed over heterosexuality, cloning has replaced sexual reproduction, and California has seceded from the mainland United States to form the gay male state of “Clonifornia.”

Wu Tsang & boychild by Tess Altman
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“It’s about creating the conditions for a moment.”

Ieva Misevičiūtė by Melanie Bonajo
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A performance artist who grew up in the circus uses clowning, street dance, and butoh in playful and provocative combinations.

Anne Garréta’s Not One Day by Youmna Chlala

If the experimental French writing group Oulipo were to be reborn today, would they return as performance artists? Anne Garréta’s 2002 Prix Médicis–winning novel, Not One Day, marks her as a literary acrobat suspended between those who hold on to the group’s relevance and those who have let it go in favor of conceptual art practices.

Morgan Bassichis by Katherine Brewer Ball
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“What’s the point of being queer, or an artist, or a radical, if you don’t veer?”

Constance DeJong by Jennifer Krasinski
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“We were relegated to Chick Lit, romance novels, our subjects were love and motherhood and other sexually-defined things. Modern Love mocks that, to some degree. It pushes back.”

Baseera Khan’s iamuslima by Terence Trouillot
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Exploring Muslim femininity through the politics of love

Ron Athey by Zackary Drucker
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From the Pentecostal churches of his youth to ’80s underground Goth punk and queer clubs to museums around the world, an iconic performance artist tells his story.

Angie Keefer and Liz Magic Laser by Liz Magic Laser
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Two interdisciplinary artists tackle the analogies between artistic, moral, and monetary value.

Rafa Esparza by Clara López Menéndez
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What a brick can do.

Portfolio by Baseera Khan
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“One actively is olived, one actively becomes a desired color, desired manufactured ethnicity.”

Nicky Paraiso by Zachary Small
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“I hope it’s not a masochistic impulse within me, but I will always stay until the end to see how a creative thought completes itself.”

Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa by Regina José Galindo
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To write about Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa is a difficult task.

Marina Abromović’s Goldberg by David Brody
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“In the coy manner of Yoko Ono, we were instructed: ‘Listen.’ (No duh.)”

Pauline Boudry / Renate Lorenz by Risa Puleo
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“We insist on repeating moments of liberation, as a kind of sustainable practice.”

Kembra Pfahler by Brienne Walsh
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Kembra Pfahler is a downtown legend: a punk rocker, screen goddess, curator, and performance artist who moved from Los Angeles to the East Village in the early 1980s. Over the course of her time in New York, she’s modeled for Calvin Klein, sang lead in the death punk metal band The Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black, and founded a performance art movement known as “Availabilism.”

M. Lamar by Risa Puleo
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“I am an artist. I am a NEGROGOTHIC, devil-worshipping, free black man in the blues tradition. Those are the things I am now.”

Jack Ferver by Joshua Lubin-Levy

Otherness is always such a big part of my work. Formally, I don’t fit any specific niche in performance. Some works, like this one, are theater that use dance. Some are more dance heavy, or maybe only dance if I’m making ballet.

Nari Ward by Lee Jaffe
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Ward’s Jamaican roots and home in Harlem have been recurring themes in his numerous installations. He speaks with Jaffe about three key works.

BOMB Specific by Katherine Hubbard
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Katherine Hubbard is an interdisciplinary artist based in Brooklyn. 

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