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Moby Dick in Hollywood—Orson Welles by Pierre Senges

Finally back in the fold of Hollywood—one imagines him advancing mistrustfully, mistrustfully looking up at the high and useless palm trees (an immoderation which serves no purpose: the palm trees “planted on both sides of the expressway in order to purge an already pure sky”).

Embrace the Dread: A Conversation with Colin Winnette by R.O. Kwon
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The writer of The Job of the Wasp on horror, human evil, and writing long sentences. 

Looking Back on 2017: Literature
Looking Back 2017 Literature

Featuring selections by Justin Taylor, Shelly Oria, Mary Walling Blackburn, Kevin Killian, Barry Schwabsky, John Freeman, and more.

Nebulous Geography: On Renee Gladman’s Houses of Ravicka by J.W. McCormack
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The imagined city from Gladman’s Ravicka series is as elusive as human self-hood. 

Alex Gilvarry and Gabe Hudson 
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The novelists on Vietnam, Norman Mailer, and the dragon’s perspective.

Ghosts of History: An Interview with Jesmyn Ward by Louis Elliott
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Congratulations to Ward on winning the 2017 National Book Award for Sing, Unburied, Sing.

Sacred Folly: on Romain Gary’s The Kites and Promise at Dawn by J.W. McCormack
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A rediscovered novel and memoir depict a character we are lucky to have on the page. In life he would mortify us.

Uplift, Clothing Optional: An Interview with Novelist D. Foy by J.T. Price
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“To credibly present ecstasy, pure ecstasy, is incredibly difficult. Once upon a time this wasn’t the case. This is what capitalism has done to us all—rendered earnestness—a thing of suspicion and contempt.”

Greed, Italian Style: on Nicola Lagioia’s Ferocity by Kristen Martin
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Corruption, capitalism, and death in Puglia.

Dance of the Self: On John Haskell’s The Complete Ballet by Will Harrison
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Noir, Balanchine, and an escape from the conventional novel.

Stormy Weather: on Andrew Durbin’s MacArthur Park by Evan Moffitt
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A globe-hopping novel ruminates on drift and disaster.

“To Lie Is to Try”: Two Books on Kathy Acker by Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore
Kathy Acker By Rick Mcginnis

Chris Kraus and Douglas A. Martin conjure the iconoclastic author.

Italy, Two Ways: Jessie Chaffee and Minna Zallman Proctor
Jessie Chaffee and Minna Zallman Proctor

“There’s often a gap between what we’re trying to say and what we are able to say. Sometimes I’m successful and sometimes I fail. Sometimes it’s painful and sometimes I get into that space where it feels right. That’s the high.”

Literature of the Present: An Interview with Nick Laird by Will Chancellor
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“Literature is a way of establishing the humanness of others. It’s interested in the relationships between people, between authenticity and truth. That in itself has to make us better disposed to each other.”

Fall Books Preview
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New titles and reissues highlighted by Justin Taylor, Chelsea Hodson, Paul La Farge, Emmalea Russo, Alexandra Kleeman, Ted Dodson, Dan Sheehan, Kristen Radtke, Daniel Saldaña París, Marjorie Welish, Tobias Carroll, Jonathan Lee, Scott Esposito, and Lauren LeBlanc

Lidia Yuknavitch by Porochista Khakpour

Writing with the body as her touchstone, the novelist channels a woman warrior in The Book of Joan.

Anne Garréta’s Not One Day by Youmna Chlala

If the experimental French writing group Oulipo were to be reborn today, would they return as performance artists? Anne Garréta’s 2002 Prix Médicis–winning novel, Not One Day, marks her as a literary acrobat suspended between those who hold on to the group’s relevance and those who have let it go in favor of conceptual art practices.

Zinzi Clemmons’s What We Lose by Yasmin Roshanian
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Mourning seeps in like water, but Clemmons skillfully draws on the humor that stems from the duality of conflicting cultures. Her prose is funny, fragile, and unflinchingly candid.

Constance DeJong by Jennifer Krasinski
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“We were relegated to Chick Lit, romance novels, our subjects were love and motherhood and other sexually-defined things. Modern Love mocks that, to some degree. It pushes back.”

Patty Yumi Cottrell by Amina Cain
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“I knew from the moment I sat down to begin the book that I wanted something gray and drab and portable and contradictory.”

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