Modernism

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One Piece: The Old Bars (after M.H.) by David Salle
David Salle The Old Bars

The artist talks about the genesis, composition, and execution of a recently completed work.

Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee by Frank Gesualdi
Johnston Lee Bomb Magazine 01

The artistic directors of the Chicago Architecture Biennial discuss their new Menil Drawing Institute and the role of history in contemporary architecture.

The Arcades: Contemporary Art & Walter Benjamin by Claire Barliant
The Arcades 01

Benjamin as hollow window dressing

SO – IL by Troy Conrad Therrien
So Il 01 Bomb 134

“The idea of misunderstanding is very much part of our time. In our firm, we are from all these different backgrounds, working in this Babylonian city, so we are also interested in process and the unintentional things emerging from that. It acknowledges our contemporary chaos.”

Lisa Immordino Vreeland by Anya Jaremko-Greenwold
Vreeland Bomb 04

“She wasn’t loved, so she didn’t know how to give love.”

Josiah McElheny’s The Light Club and A Prism by Sabine Russ
Josiah McElheny 01

The artist Josiah McElheny has published two books that display his collaboration with artists, scholars, scientists and creative writers, offering a multitude of voices, speculations, fictions, and facts.

David Diao by Matthew Deleget
Diao David 1

Diao’s first comprehensive retrospective, at the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art—fittingly, in the painter’s native China—is the occasion for a conversation that looks back at fifty years of artistic production.

Michael Hofmann by Keenan McCracken
Roth Manuscript

Deep language, the “silver” figures of literature, and reader as pit canary.

Joanne Greenbaum by Jeremy Sigler
Joanne Greenbaum 1

Greenbaum on the fundamentally personal and private process of creating art, and how modernism, rage and rebellion fuel her creativity.

Jed Rasula and Tim Conley’s Burning City: Poems of Metropolitan Modernity by Alan Gilbert
Anatol Stern's Europa

There are many artistic modernisms. There are alternative modernisms, alternatives to modernism, and antimodernisms.

Josiah McElheny by Gregg Bordowitz
Mcelheny 1 Body

“History has shown that universalism is a step away from totalitarianism—a deadly kind of erasure that I find horrifying. The fear of fascism undermines my sensuous relationship to those things. I often wonder, are there any other alternative aesthetics?”

Joe Zucker by Chuck Close
Zucker01 Body

“I have diversity in my work, but I also have control of it. I rarely paint things that I like.”

Amid Amidi’s Cartoon Modern: Style and Design in Fifties Animation by Duncan Teater
Amidi 1

In Chicago, where I live, I can eat a cup of decent pea soup at a bakery across the street from the Richard J. Daley Center, a sharp steel and glass courthouse tower. 

Pedro Reyes by Tatiana Cuevas
Reyes 01 Body

Pedro Reyes works within a complex system of associations that defies our assumptions about the ways in which knowledge is categorized and legitimized. 

Cannon Hudson by Rachel Kushner
Cannon Hudson 01

Cannon Hudson paints architectural interiors. On first glance, many of his paintings look like pictorial space populated by shapes resembling Sol LeWitt sculptures.

Arturo Herrera by Josiah McElheny​
Herrera 01 Body

Herrera’s use of profane materials—familiar, commonplace images—“contaminate” the carefully circumscribed world of the abstract.

Julie Langsam by Saul Ostrow
Julie Langsam 01

Painter Julie Langsam suggests the failures of two artistic movements—Romanticism and modernism—through her use of non-traditional landscape styles.

Steven Holl by Joseph Masheck
Holl 01 Body

Steven Holl likes to wake up early in the morning and begin his projects with pencil, paper, and watercolors. This freehand working up of an architectural space perhaps serves as a clue to the sometimes idiosyncratic results. 

Michael Goldberg by Saul Ostrow

Michael Goldberg (1924–2007) was BOMB’s most knowledgeable and discerning editor, one of America’s greatest painters, and one of our very dearest friends.

Bruce Altshuler’s The Avant-Garde in Exhibition: New Art in the 20th Century by Saul Ostrow
Bruce Altshuler 1

Though anecdotal in form, the book’s message is that the conceptual schema dominating our perception of modernism is not the whole story. The past represented is interesting not only for its historical value, but also for the alternative models and traditions.

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