Mexican Culture

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Postcommodity by Rob Goyanes
Postcommodity Bomb 5

“Moving bodies generate this system. They create, supposedly, some justification to play this market out.”

Edmundo Paz-Soldán’s Norte by ​Jacqueline Loss
248090966 12202016 Edmundo Paz Soldan Bomb 01

Set in what translator Valerie Miles calls a “space of the imagination,” Edmundo Paz-Soldán’s new novel, Norte, uncovers its characters’ complicated relationships to expression and the trappings of readymade discourses. While some search for their norte, or direction, others are directionless and detached.

Carmen Boullosa’s Before, Translated by Peter Bush by Will Heinrich
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Carmen Boullosa’s novel Before begins with the kind of grand existential problem so difficult to disentangle from the problems of consciousness itself: “Where were we before we got to this point?”

Laia Jufresa by Valeria Luiselli
Laia Jufresa 01 Bomb 137

The author’s first novel is set in Mexico City, but its themes of violence, grief, and solitude are truly global.

Hans Ulrich Obrist’s Conversations in Mexico
132520448 09072016 Conversations In Mexico 01 Bomb 137

The nth volume of interviews by curator Hans Ulrich Obrist gathers fourteen conversations with surviving luminaries of an era of Mexican culture that in hindsight is nothing short of magnificent, despite its under-recognized or somewhat forgotten status abroad.

Ester Partegàs by Eduardo Abaroa
Partegas Ester 01

Mold-making and photography have an ambiguous relationship to whatever they reproduce. They can deliver the most faithful rendition of a given model, but it is precisely this similarity that makes them extraordinary, unreal.

Javier Téllez’s To Have Done with the Judgment of God by Silvia Benedetti
520719196 06092016 Javier Tellez Bomb 1

Venezuelan-born artist Javier Téllez’s first exhibition at Koenig & Clinton took its title from his recent film To Have Done with the Judgment of God (2016) and concerns an experience that marked Antonin Artaud’s life in 1936: the author’s encounter with the Rarámuri community living in the Sierra Tarahumara in northwest Mexico.

Malcolm Lowry in the Supermarket by Daniel Saldaña París

There are cities more present in the warp and weft of literature than others; that’s clear. The literary prestige of New York, Paris, or Mexico City is both undeniable and well-deserved: certain books, once read, transform forever the faces of those cities, superimposing a layer of fiction on their sidewalks and traffic signals.

Daniel Saldaña París by Ottessa Moshfegh
Daniel Paris Bomb 1

“I feel ignored and doomed to anonymity, but free to do whatever I want within the sacred space of literature.”

A Vindication of Hypnosis by Sergio Pitol
Emily Gordon, Fiori rosa, fiori di pesco

Suddenly, during a pause in his monologue, Federico Pérez cautioned me not to become too lost in circumlocution.

Watchword / Santo y seña by Kristin Dykstra
​Russell Lee

For some readers, the pleasures of the 2012 release Watchword will derive from translator Forrest Gander’s English renditions of the poems, which showcase the striking work of Mexico’s Pura López Colomé.

Francis Alÿs by Carla Faesler
​Francis Alÿs 01

After a lunch consisting of meatballs, rice, and lemonade, Francis Alÿs coordinates the afternoon plans for his son Elliot. The main activity is soccer practice, but Alÿs determines it’d be best to get to homework right away.

Gabriel Orozco by Carmen Boullosa
Orozco 01

Carmen Boullosa talks with Gabriel Orozco about how remnants of the natural world and the everyday are utterly re-imagined in his work.

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