Memory

122 Articles
Sorted by
Mathieu Lindon’s Learning What Love Means by Andrew Durbin
Herve Guibert 01

It is both a memoir of Lindon’s literary friendships and a treatise on survival, a tribute to the friends whose care and love, in Lindon’s words, saved his life, even as they were themselves lost.

One Piece: There’s a bright side somewhere by Alteronce Gumby
Alteronce Gumby Brightside

The artist talks about the genesis, composition, and execution of a recently completed work.

Adrienne Truscott by Erin Markey
Truscott 01

The performers consider memory, autobiography, and stand-up in Truscott’s groundbreaking comedy about rape, Asking for It, showing this November at NYU’s Skirball Center.

Italy, Two Ways: Jessie Chaffee and Minna Zallman Proctor
Jessie Chaffee and Minna Zallman Proctor

“There’s often a gap between what we’re trying to say and what we are able to say. Sometimes I’m successful and sometimes I fail. Sometimes it’s painful and sometimes I get into that space where it feels right. That’s the high.”

On the Clock with Amanda Ross-Ho by John Yau
Amanda Ross Ho 01

The gallery as studio.

After the Coda by ​Hilary Leichter
Amelia Gray Isadora 01

To sink is to save in Amelia Gray’s Isadora.

Use the Reality: Alejandro Jodorowsky’s Endless Poetry by Alex Zafiris
Alejandro Jodorowsky Endless Poetry 01

The filmmaker speaks about his self-portrait as a young poet

Zinzi Clemmons’s What We Lose by Yasmin Roshanian
Zinzi Clemmons What We Lose Bomb Magazine 01

Mourning seeps in like water, but Clemmons skillfully draws on the humor that stems from the duality of conflicting cultures. Her prose is funny, fragile, and unflinchingly candid.

Pradeep Dalal by Nancy Davenport
Pradeep Dalal Bomb Magazine 01

The encounter between two different types of records and two different experiences—the diagram and the snapshot—is everywhere visible in and crucial to Dalal’s work.

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz by Jeanine Oleson
280859765 03272017 Beatriz Santiago Munoz Bomb 01

Concerned primarily with Puerto Rico and the Caribbean, where she lives and works, her works defy categorization or any simple read. Rather, they are rich entanglements of place, history, and time.

Sophie Calle’s Rachel Monique by Jennifer Krasinski
Sophie Calle Bomb 01

As her mother, Monique Sindler, lay dying, the artist Sophie Calle put a camera at her bedside in order to record her last words. Having always wished to be a part of her daughter’s work, her mother responded: “Finally!”

Rachel Cusk by Alex Zafiris
Rachel Cusk 01

“For these books to work, the reader needs to play at least some role in the ‘writing’ of them.”

Okwui Okpokwasili by Jenn Joy
Okwui Okpokwasili 01 Bomb 137

The celebrated choreographer of Bronx Gothic explores the embodiment of psychic space, the nature of memory, and who gets to write history.

Javier Téllez’s To Have Done with the Judgment of God by Silvia Benedetti
520719196 06092016 Javier Tellez Bomb 1

Venezuelan-born artist Javier Téllez’s first exhibition at Koenig & Clinton took its title from his recent film To Have Done with the Judgment of God (2016) and concerns an experience that marked Antonin Artaud’s life in 1936: the author’s encounter with the Rarámuri community living in the Sierra Tarahumara in northwest Mexico.

Ryan Trecartin by Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer
Trecartin Bomb 01

“I liked thinking about the word occupy literally. To occupy something. To occupy a sensation or a history and then to be kicked out of it and be squatting near it and trying to reinvest in it.”

Laurie Anderson by Gary M. Kramer
Laurie Anderson Bomb 1

“I watched language falling apart.”

from Where the Bird Sings Best by Alejandro Jodorowsky
Benjamin Naca. Untitled

In those good old days, Salvador Arcavi, the first of a long series of Salvadors—traditionally all his descendants had the same name—though respectful of the Holy Book, decided he was not to going to be a prisoner to its letters.

Portfolio by Theresa Himmer

Parallel Memories

Simon Critchley’s Memory Theatre by Nova Benway
Liam Gillick Combo

“Who speaks in the work of Samuel Beckett?” asks Simon Critchley in his probing 1998 essay on the nature of the Irish writer’s narrative voice.

Andra Ursuta by Veronika Vogler
Ursuta 01

I first encountered Andra Ursuta’s work at her show Solitary Fitness, at Venus Over Manhattan, in New York City, in 2013. 

No more results to load.
Nothing found—try broadening your search.