Materiality

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Sculpting Space: Ruth Asawa at David Zwirner by Osman Can Yerebakan
Asawa1

Mixing ardor and ethereality.

Anoka Faruqee and Michelle Grabner
Faruqee Anoka 01

Two artists find a mutual fascination with both the aesthetic qualities of repetition and the mechanical means of reproduction.

What Objects Can Do: on Jiro Takamatsu by William Corwin
692153101 08222017 Jiro Takamutsu 01

A new look at the actions, drawings, and sculpture of the late Japanese artist.

Lynda Benglis by Federica Bueti
Lynda Benglis Bomb 01

The eminent artist discusses her materials, “frozen gestures,” and the illusion of form.

Audra Wolowiec by Emmalea Russo
Wolowiec 01

Audra Wolowiec explores the materiality of language via text, sound, sculpture, and collaborative projects. Her recent solo exhibition at Studio 10, entitled (                      ), presented both the immateriality and materiality of her subject matter as subtle and poetic experiences. 

Sadie Benning by Lia Gangitano
Benning Bomb 01

“With film, you have sound and you can construct this whole environment that allows for a certain feeling to exist for someone watching. There’s more of a burden on a painting to develop these kinds of feelings or experiences in one frame.”

Ethan Greenbaum by Andrianna Campbell
Greenbaum Tyvek 1

“It’s nice when you can make connections in hindsight. Your life feels like chaos and then you realize that there are patterns.”

Ryan Foerster by Ashley McNelis
Ryan Foerster Bomb 1

“If this is what this material does now, just treat it as a positive thing.“

Giuliana Bruno by Sarah Oppenheimer
Anthony Mccall Long Film For Four Projectors

Navigating the concentric interiors of the Glass Pavilion at the Toledo Museum of Art, the building unfolds along a serpentine walkway. Through the museum’s glass walls, the view opens uninterrupted. 

Valerie Snobeck by Joe Fyfe
Snobeck 01

“The absurdity of this material’s resistance made me want to work with the plastic, the peels. The plastic is part of us, part of me and my contribution, too, even if not directly. Plastic is estranged from me, but it is me.”

Scott Olson by Veronika Vogler
Scott Olson 1

Painter Scott Olson on stumbling upon materials, the Ohio art scene, and the importance of frames.

Adrienne Antonson by Effie Bowen
Grasshopper

Adrienne Antonson on designing smocks, making sculptures out of human hair and the problems of sustainable design.

Daniel Wiener by Alexander Ross
Flame Meander Hires02 New Body

“Wow, that’s quite a baroque nightmare happening there on your wall … . It’s petrified dragon skin, right?” I’m imagining dinner guests arriving at some home where Daniel Wiener’s acid-trip sculpture Flame Meander is threatening to crawl down and fuse with someone’s spinal column. 

Michelle Segre by huma bhabha

I have been fortunate to have such a relationship with Michelle Segre and her work—from collages of gangs of legs cut from comic book pages, gnawed alien-bone mobiles, and giant pieces of moldy bread and larger-than-life mushrooms recalling the soft sculptures of Claes Oldenburg, right up to her current work.

Sheila Pepe by Ryan Johnson
Pepe 3 New Body

One of Sheila Pepe’s choice materials has been the ordinary shoelace, so present in our everyday lives as to be almost invisible. Tying your shoelaces is a ritual shared by most and may hold an exceptional significance for an artist based in New York, this great city of the pedestrian.

Tamara Zahaykevich by B. Wurtz
4 Harry Goody Body

Mies van der Rohe’s statement “God is in the details” came to mind recently as I was thinking about Tamara Zahaykevich’s work.

Jac Leirner in Conversation with Adele Nelson by ​Ursula Davila-Villa
Jac Leirner 01

Ursula Davila-Villa discusses the minimalist work of Jac Lernier as well as the publication of her conversations with Adele Nelson.

Alan Uglow (1941–2011) by Saul Ostrow
Alan Uglow 01

A tribute to the late British-American abstract painter from one of BOMB’s founders.

Rachel Hovnanian by Mimi Thompson
Rachel Hovnovian 5 Bomb Body

Although beauty’s fragile existence indicates its imminent end, our culture seems determined to keep youth’s flawless face and undeniable power on extended loan.

Joe Fyfe by Josh Blackwell
Dargah

Joe Fyfe tells painter Josh Blackwell about his involvement in abstraction as a by-product of loss and the wabi-sabi discovered on his travels to Vietnam, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh.

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