Literature––History And Criticism

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Fragments as Form: Mary Robison’s Why Did I Ever by Lincoln Michel
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The great lost American fragment novel.

A Panacea for Anti-Intellectualism: Martin Amis’s The Rub of Time by Ryan Chapman
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A new collection of criticism and reportage considers Trump, Bellow, and the pleasures of close reading.

“Truth Is Never the Whole Truth” and Other Aphorisms by Muriel Spark
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February 1 marked the centenary of Muriel Spark’s birth, and we’re celebrating with a selection of the British master’s aphorisms, notes, and observations.

Looking Back on 2017: Literature
Looking Back 2017 Literature

Featuring selections by Justin Taylor, Shelly Oria, Mary Walling Blackburn, Kevin Killian, Barry Schwabsky, John Freeman, and more.

Terence Davies’s A Quiet Passion by Tan Lin
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A Quiet Passion, Terence Davies’s biopic about the poet Emily Dickinson, faces a problem typical of movies seeking to recreate the life of a literary figure: how to accommodate film to language, and, in particular, to Dickinson’s dense, elliptical, and unconventionally punctuated and often abstract poetry.

Alexandra Kleeman & Lincoln Michel
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On genre, influence, and getting weird in fiction.

Javier Téllez’s To Have Done with the Judgment of God by Silvia Benedetti
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Venezuelan-born artist Javier Téllez’s first exhibition at Koenig & Clinton took its title from his recent film To Have Done with the Judgment of God (2016) and concerns an experience that marked Antonin Artaud’s life in 1936: the author’s encounter with the Rarámuri community living in the Sierra Tarahumara in northwest Mexico.

Toni Sala by Hal Hlavinka
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“What distinguishes the writer from the reader is that the writer goes first.”

John Wieners’s Supplication: Selected Poems and Stars Seen in Person: Selected Journals by Patrick James Dunagan
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The newly published journals match and exceed all preexisting Wieners publications. 

Guillaume Apollinaire’s Zone: Selected Poems, translated by Ron Padgett by Dylan Furcall
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One of the joys of reading Zone is discovering the utter range of Padgett’s stylings as both translator and poet.

Alice Notley by Robert Dewhurst

Notley’s body of work consists of over thirty-five collections of poetry and prose. To consider her oeuvre, in her interlocutor’s words, is to court “cerebral and sensory overload.”

Portfolio by Stephen Crowe

Illustrating the impossible.

Patti Smith: Camera Solo by Rena Silverman
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If a collection of seventy photographs, an installation, and a film prove one thing, it’s that Patti Smith rocks much more than one world.

A Stroll through Literature by Roberto Bolaño

This First Proof contains an excerpt from A Stroll through Literature, by Roberto Bolaño, translated by Laura Healy. 

The Revised Life: Gordon Lish by B.C. Edwards
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Gordon Lish has loomed large in the background of the American short story for nearly half a century. His recent Collected Fictions provides a re-affirmation of his incredible influence on a form he so clearly treasures. B.C. Edwards spoke with Lish over the phone about revision, reduction and the silence that precedes reading.

The Kenning Anthology of Poets Theater 1945–85 by Mac Wellman
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Kevin Killian and David Brazil have done a great service in their new Kenning Anthology of Poets Theater 1945–85. The selection is wide-ranging, eclectic, and generally highly intelligent. 

Matias Viegener & Christine Wertheim’s The /n/oulipian Analects by Tom La Farge
​Johanna Drucker

If you’re interested in the writing practices associated with Oulipo (founded in 1960, it has included Raymond Queneau, Harry Mathews, Italo Calvino, and Georges Perec), you’ll want this book recording a 2005 conference on the poetics of constraint. 

James Wood’s The Broken Estate: Essays on Literature and Belief by Benjamin Anastas

I would like to see the condition of a book after James Wood has finished reading it: the actual book, the spine we readers splay and cradle, the jacket where we leave our fingerprints, the pages we turn instinctively and crease at the upper corner when a paragraph catches the eye, or when the hour we have stolen for reading—and only reading—has passed.

David Dante Troutt’s The Monkey Suit by Rone Shavers

Sometimes it is simply the inspiration behind a fiction that’s enough to cause a stir.

Angela Carter’s Shaking a Leg: Journalism and Writings by Minna Proctor

With scant exception, the writing of literary criticism is a balkanized art. 

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