Latin American Literature

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From This Side and from That Side by Gabriela Wiener
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We are street people. Nomadic by nature. We are the grandchildren of poor, adventurous strangers. Our living radicalizes their legacy.

Lifting Reality onto a Pedestal: Rodrigo Fresán Interviewed by Fran G. Matute
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The celebrated Argentine novelist on writing about writers, avoiding labels, and why critics shouldn’t write fiction.

The Frays of Life: On Julián Herbert’s Tomb Song by Hunter Braithwaite
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Autofiction that explores the borderland between memoir and vision quest.

One Poem by Martín Gambarotta
Hugh Scott-Douglas

One point: / it came from that way and goes this way / the lukewarm thought

Two Poems by Marília Garcia
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when you say / erase / do you mean / stop existing?

The Fog of Family by Charlotte Whittle
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Legacy and estrangement in Diego Zúñiga’s Camanchaca

from Atlantic Hotel by João Gilberto Noll

I got on the bus and saw that my seat was at the end of the aisle, next to a very pretty blonde. Typical blonde girl’s freckles under her eyes. She was wearing a black sweater and blue velvet pants. Her seat was next to the window.

After the Massacre by Carlos Fonseca
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Staging historical justice in Hernán Ronsino’s Glaxo

Edmundo Paz-Soldán’s Norte by ​Jacqueline Loss
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Set in what translator Valerie Miles calls a “space of the imagination,” Edmundo Paz-Soldán’s new novel, Norte, uncovers its characters’ complicated relationships to expression and the trappings of readymade discourses. While some search for their norte, or direction, others are directionless and detached.

The Swede by Ernesto Cardenal

I’m a Swede. I want you to be aware of this from the start because this fact is responsible for the strangest episode of my life, which I want to tell you about now.

Edmundo Paz-Soldán by Scott Esposito
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“Breaking away from magical realism ended up creating another stereotype: that of a generation obsessed with mass media, new technologies, and disdainful of politics.”

Carmen Boullosa’s Before, Translated by Peter Bush by Will Heinrich
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Carmen Boullosa’s novel Before begins with the kind of grand existential problem so difficult to disentangle from the problems of consciousness itself: “Where were we before we got to this point?”

Laia Jufresa by Valeria Luiselli
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The author’s first novel is set in Mexico City, but its themes of violence, grief, and solitude are truly global.

Malcolm Lowry in the Supermarket by Daniel Saldaña París

There are cities more present in the warp and weft of literature than others; that’s clear. The literary prestige of New York, Paris, or Mexico City is both undeniable and well-deserved: certain books, once read, transform forever the faces of those cities, superimposing a layer of fiction on their sidewalks and traffic signals.

Daniel Saldaña París by Ottessa Moshfegh
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“I feel ignored and doomed to anonymity, but free to do whatever I want within the sacred space of literature.”

Alexandre Vidal Porto by Bruna Dantas Lobato
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“What can’t I be in São Paulo that I could become in New York?”

Álvaro Enrigue by Scott Esposito
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“A writer worried about reception is cooking a dead book. A writer’s job is to produce the best possible book in absolute freedom, so the category ‘acceptable’ does not play in the process at all.”

Signor Hoffman by Eduardo Halfon

From the train I could look out onto the infinite blue of the sea. I was still exhausted, wakeful from the overnight transatlantic flight to Rome, but looking out at the sea, that Mediterranean sea that was so infinite and so blue, made me forget it all, even myself. I don’t know why.

Chronicles of Nueva York (El Bar Stonewall) by Pedro Lemebel

So they invite you to Nueva York, all expenses paid, to participate in an event for Stonewall, twenty years after the police brawl starring the gay girls who, in 1964, took over a bar in the Village. 

Hyperbolics by Valeria Luiselli
Valeria Luiselli

Our first lot is a piece in a somewhat deteriorated state. Yet, considering its antiquity, the overall condition is good; one might even say excellent.

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