Latin American Film

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Eduardo Coutinho’s Man Marked For Death/ Twenty Years Later by Will Noah
Eduardo Coutinho 01

In the early 1960s, Eduardo Coutinho began shooting a film about the murder of Brazilian trade unionist João Pedro Teixeira.

Use the Reality: Alejandro Jodorowsky’s Endless Poetry by Alex Zafiris
Alejandro Jodorowsky Endless Poetry 01

The filmmaker speaks about his self-portrait as a young poet

Salomé Lamas by Matt Turner
Salome Lamas Bomb 1

“Questions that once belonged to the cinematic institution have been set upon the world of spectacle we live in today. These questions belong to all of us now.”

The Human Surge by Danielle Burgos
Human Surge 01

Eduardo Williams’s debut feature takes us around the world on an ethnographic tour of labor, leisure, and logins.

Ciro Guerra by Andrew Bourne
Ciro Guerra Bomb 1

“It was no longer important to be accurate. I came to understand that imagination and dreams were as important to them as any fact.”

Oscar Ruiz Navia by Gary M. Kramer
Oscar Ruiz Navia 1

Graffiti, politics, and tracking shots.

Lisandro Alonso by Nicholas Elliott
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Where the horse opera meets a fairy tale.

On the Cinema Tropical Awards by Gary M. Kramer
Purgatorio

Shining a light on Latin American cinema.

Gabriel Mascaro by Giovanni Marchini Camia
August Wind Directed By Mascaro 1

Cemeteries and mansions by the sea.

Looking Back on 2014 #3
Vision Orange

Selections by Nate Wooley, Laida Lertxundi, and Sarah Gerard.

Matías Piñeiro by Giovanni Marchini Camia
The Princess of France

Shakespeare in Buenos Aires.

Martín Rejtman by Giovanni Marchini Camia
Martín Rejtman 01

“I prefer the film to be independent of myself. If you and your film are the same, then why make films?”

Ricardo Nicolayevsky by Luis Felipe Fabre
Nicholay 1

It’s hard to pin down exactly what happens with Lost Portraits, an almost mythical series of Super 8 and 16mm shorts—filmed between 1982–85 in Mexico City and New York—depicting Nicolayevsky’s young friends and peers while he was a film student at NYU.

Casa de Lava: Scrapbook by Tânia Cypriano
Cypriano 2001 201000

While filming, Pedro Costa met people there who led him to Fontainhas, a now-vanished slum on the outskirts of Lisbon where many Cape Verdean immigrants used to live. Even as it was being torn down, this place became the location and actual subject of Costa’s future projects.

Violeta Went to Heaven by Cecilia Vicuña
Andrés Wood 1

Andrés Wood’s film, Violeta Went to Heaven, brought me back to a decisive moment. I am 14 and I am crossing a threshold. I am walking down a hallway at my aunt Lola’s house on Manuel Montt Street in Santiago de Chile.

Matías Piñeiro by Clinton Krute
Todos mienten

Matías Piñeiro makes intricate films that play with literature, history and language. His Shakespearean Viola opens on July 12 at the Film Society of Lincoln Center alongside a retrospective of his films.

Raúl Ruiz’s Night Across the Street by Chris Chang
Edschoice Lanuitden

Raúl Ruiz’s film, Night Across the Street, is an ode to antiheroic characters, and feels more like a coded public message than a late-style work.

Gerardo Naranjo and Nicolás Pereda
Nicolás Pereda 01

Pereda, a prolific minimalist, and Naranjo, known for his highly stylized portraits of disaffected youth, discuss their divergent styles, practices, and their shared “exile” from their native Mexico.

Javier Téllez by Pedro Reyes
Tellez 1

Erasmus of Rotterdam claimed there were three types of people: those who lived in a dream world, those who lived in reality, and those who were able to turn one world into the other. The Venezuelan artist Javier Téllez belongs in this third category.

Javier Téllez (en Español) by Pedro Reyes
Tellez 1

Erasmo de Rotterdam decía que existían tres tipos de personas: aquellas que vivían en el sueño, aquellas que vivían en la realidad, y el tercer tipo que convertía uno en lo otro.

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