Immigration

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Humanizing the Border: John Moore Interviewed by Francisco Cantú
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A photojournalist discusses the stories behind his images of immigration in an age of militarized border enforcement.

Through Our Vulnerabilities: Aldrin Valdez Interviewed by Sarah Sala
ESL or You Weren’t Here

The poet on returning to the Philippines, writing about queer identity, and producing a book that is a document of the body.

Volatile and Transitory: Babak Lakghomi Interviewed by Zach Davidson
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A novella of warranted paranoia. 

No Community Is a Monolith: Vanessa Hua Interviewed by Mary Wang
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The writer on working across genres, exploring the nuances of transnational identities, and resisting the expectations of a single, Chinese American narrative.

Migrant World: On Ai Weiwei’s Human Flow by T. J. Demos
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Examining the politics of representation. 

Supple Language: Jesse Chun Interviewed by Hannah Stamler
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Disfiguring the hegemony of standard English.

FOLD: Golden Venture Paper Sculptures by Chantal McStay
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From a tragic shipwreck to an epic, collective political art project.

Joshua Bonnetta & J.P. Sniadecki’s El Mar La Mar by Matt Turner
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An experimental documentary on border crossing, less about that place than what it represents.

Dalya’s Other Country: Julia Meltzer Interviewed by Alaa Hassan
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A story of immigration and integration.

The Dreary Coast by Ed Winstead
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Difference and hyperbole in Mohsin Hamid’s Exit West

Edmundo Paz-Soldán’s Norte by ​Jacqueline Loss
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Set in what translator Valerie Miles calls a “space of the imagination,” Edmundo Paz-Soldán’s new novel, Norte, uncovers its characters’ complicated relationships to expression and the trappings of readymade discourses. While some search for their norte, or direction, others are directionless and detached.

Edmundo Paz-Soldán by Scott Esposito
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“Breaking away from magical realism ended up creating another stereotype: that of a generation obsessed with mass media, new technologies, and disdainful of politics.”

Foreign Exchange by Elina Alter
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European Cinema at the 54th New York Film Festival

Mel Chin by Saul Ostrow
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Wry installations and revelatory sculptures blend art-making and activism in Chin’s unique practice of transformation.

Alexandre Vidal Porto by Bruna Dantas Lobato
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“What can’t I be in São Paulo that I could become in New York?”

Frederick Wiseman by Nicholas Elliott
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“The best comedy is sad comedy.”

Leeza Meksin by Sophie Pinkham
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In the garden behind the gallery, Meksin installed Winglet, a huge piece of hot-pink open mesh layered with smaller pieces of bright-pink and neon-green patterned spandex.

Alberto Ríos by Yezmin Villarreal
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“A weight carried by two, weighs only half as much.”

Atticus Lish by Jesse Barron
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Hardship, the borough of Queens, and new American pilgrims.

Cherien Dabis by June Stein
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Dabis wrote her film Amreeka, in theaters now, in response to her family’s Arab-American experience. An immigrant’s tale, the search for a better future in the Promised Land is full of seismic changes.

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