Historical Fiction

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Uplift, Clothing Optional: An Interview with Novelist D. Foy by J.T. Price
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“To credibly present ecstasy, pure ecstasy, is incredibly difficult. Once upon a time this wasn’t the case. This is what capitalism has done to us all—rendered earnestness—a thing of suspicion and contempt.”

Paul Kingsnorth’s Beast by Tyler Curtis
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The Wake—Paul Kingsnorth’s 2014 debut novel, which chronicles the life of an Anglo-Saxon during the Norman Conquest—has since gained a disturbing resonance with the recent surge and codification of nationalism that is Brexit.

The Writer and The Terrorist: on Antonio Muñoz Molina’s Like a Fading Shadow by Will Augerot
117764297 08302017 Photo Illustration Of The Lorraine Hotel In Memphis

The Spanish novelist confronts the monstrosity of James Earl Ray.

After the Coda by ​Hilary Leichter
Amelia Gray Isadora 01

To sink is to save in Amelia Gray’s Isadora.

Christos Chrissopoulos’s The Parthenon Bomber by Saul Anton
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Partly inspired by the Greek surrealist Yorgos Makris’s 1944 manifesto, “Let’s Blow Up the Acropolis!,” Christos Chrissopoulos’s novella, The Parthenon Bomber, sets out to imagine just what might lead a young man to write himself into history by blowing up an ur-symbol of Western civilization.

Hoaxing History by Hayden Bennett
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Obscuring the past to get at truth in Paul La Farge’s The Night Ocean

George Saunders by Sam Lipsyte
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Historical analogies between the Civil War period and our own time are plentiful in a conversation about the author’s much-anticipated first novel, Lincoln in the Bardo.

Fanny’s Lament (More Experimental Animals) by Thalia Field

It was with the printing press and Enlightenment science that history first demarcated itself from literature as a field of knowledge founded on scientific principles and archival methods.

Carver & Cobain by David Means

A few years ago, I drafted two linked stories, one about Kurt Cobain and the other about Raymond Carver. Both grew up in the Pacific Northwest. Both had fathers who worked at a sawmill. Both were, in one way or another, working-class kids. 

Malcolm Lowry in the Supermarket by Daniel Saldaña París

There are cities more present in the warp and weft of literature than others; that’s clear. The literary prestige of New York, Paris, or Mexico City is both undeniable and well-deserved: certain books, once read, transform forever the faces of those cities, superimposing a layer of fiction on their sidewalks and traffic signals.

Stephen O’Connor by Melody Nixon
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”In a way, I am like some demented lawyer seeking only to get a hung jury—with the saving grace being that, when the truth is not obvious, people tend to do their most profound and significant thinking.”

Álvaro Enrigue by Scott Esposito
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“A writer worried about reception is cooking a dead book. A writer’s job is to produce the best possible book in absolute freedom, so the category ‘acceptable’ does not play in the process at all.”

David Means’s Hystopia by Chantal McStay
Means David Hystopia Bomb 01

The crisply constructed short stories for which David Means has become renowned are high and tight. His new—and first—novel, Hystopia, is something shaggier, departing, in its theoretical approach, from the New Yorker School of Fiction for the emerging field of narrative medicine, in which testimonies of trauma are inherently wooly and chaotic rather than refined and concise.

Rombaud by Álvaro Enrigue
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Jean Rombaud had the worst of all possible tasks on the morning of May 19, 1536: severing with a single blow the head of Anne Boleyn, Marquess of Pembroke and Queen of England, a young woman so beautiful she had turned the Strait of Dover into a veritable Atlantic.

Making Tom (Return): Behind the Scenes by Jeffery Renard Allen

He is Tom at the same time that he is too preposterous to be Tom.

Ottessa Moshfegh by Lorin Stein
Honoré Daumier

Voice, vulnerability, and putting the intellect to bed.

Lost Time by Leah Umansky
Lena Gieseke

Andrew Sean Greer on time travel and the living of life in his new novel The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells.

The Insult: “Shut up, you dirty greaser.” From Tejas by Carmen Boullosa

It’s high noon in Bruneville. Not a cloud in the sky. 

Jaime Manrique by Edith Grossman
Jaime Manrique By Ra L Jalube Body

“The tragedy of imperialism is that its dehumanizing machinery disrupts the cultures of the colonized. That’s why after imperial powers conquer a nation it sometimes takes centuries for the conquered to create cohesive civilizations again and to regain their identity.”

Susanna Moore by Kurt Andersen
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“Crises always present a moral dilemma—how are we to behave virtuously, and still manage to survive?”

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