Grief

27 Articles
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Prageeta Sharma and James Thomas Stevens
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On a visit to the New Mexico Museum of Art, two poets grapple with questions of performed authenticity and settler poetics, while analyzing depictions of the American West.

Angela Schanelec’s I Was at Home, But… by Anthony Hawley
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Much silence fills the exquisite visual tableaus in German filmmaker Angela Schanelec’s I Was at Home, But…

This Broken, Jarring Thing: Enda Walsh Interviewed by Tadhg Hoey
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The Irish playwright on grief, adaptation, and the possibilities of form.

From Vincent and Alice and Alice by Shane Jones
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We’re walking through the centered skylight spaces of the mall. I drop back on the cloud-white floor tiles, holding my phone up to record a video. Beautiful in its own way to watch in reality, but when I replay the video, following Alice into a store selling soap, the video doesn’t show Alice, only oval shaped air heat-trembling at the edges. I replay it three times, shocked each time when I’m unable to see her.

One Piece: Essay (Panic Angel) by Brook Hsu
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The artist talks about the genesis, composition, and execution of a recently completed work.

From Imagine Wanting Only This by Kristen Radtke
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Kristen Radtke is the managing editor of Sarabande Books and the film and video editor of TriQuarterly magazine. She lives in New York. Imagine Wanting Only This is her debut book, out in mid-April from Pantheon.

Moon Over Quabbin by Michael Coffey

The woman is in Iowa now, I hear. She moved there with her husband shortly after, and now she sees.

Kenya (Robinson) by Lee Ann Norman
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Kenya (Robinson) reflects on the end of her MFA program and becoming a professional artist.

Bough Down by Karen Green

The doctor wears his pink shirt with the sleeves rolled up.

Ralph Lemon by James Hannaham
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“The reason I am writing fiction is so that I can tell the truth from a vantage point that allows me some space.”

Heidi Julavits by Fiona Maazel
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“You can renovate your soul and change your behavior and lie to yourself, but maybe the face is the last frontier of truth. There’s only so much that plastic surgery can do for you.”

Stuff We Like by Hannah Jansen
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Ever wonder what stuff the BOMB staff likes? Check out the new Stuff We Like column and then get watching, reading, and listening.

How Can You Stay in the House All Day and Not Go Anywhere by Richard J. Goldstein
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Ralph Lemon’s How Can You Stay in the House All Day and Not Go Anywhere is as uncontainable as it is elusive. How can a dance that pretty much denies its existence as dance, a “no dance” of “no style,” be written about?

Prayer, 6/13/08 by Jamie Quatro
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Loss of any kind can feel, to the bereaved, as much an “act of God” as large-scale catastrophe.

The Primordial Cry: caraballo-farman by Kristin Prevallet
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Poet and essayist Kristin Prevallet talks to artists caraballo-farman about their series The Heirloom Plates, part of the exhibition Iran Inside Out at the Chelsea Art Museum through September 4th.

Four Poems by Rusty Morrison

This First Proof contains four poems titled “An Intersection of Leaves not Likeness” and “An Intersection of Leaves not Loss.”

Ay by Lina Meruane

Ay, the smell was swept up, stirred, and scrambled into the air when your father slammed the door; I had barely noticed it until he appeared in the doorway and raised his hand over his nose, covering his mouth. 

Patriots by Patrick Dacey

Right around the time the war on terror began, I thought, Does Donna really need so many friggin’ flags? 

Fiction for Driving Across America: Patriots by Patrick Dacey

In the second installment in BOMB’s Fiction for Driving Across America series, Patrick Dacey reads his short story “Patriots,” published in BOMB 104’s literary supplement, First Proof.

Trauma by Patrick McGrath

The narrator is Charlie Weir, a New York psychiatrist. The year is 1979.

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