Graffiti

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Brandan “Bmike” Odums by Zachary Lazar
Odums Brandan 01

After Hurricane Katrina, Brandan “Bmike” Odums realized that the graffiti he and other artists were making in the abandoned buildings around New Orleans had an inherent political value, not just because of the subject matter (though Odums himself had always had an affinity for depicting civil-rights icons) but also because creating art in those depopulated spaces foregrounded their meaning, calling attention to what they had once been, what they had been allowed to become, and why.

Judith Bernstein by Sofia Leiby
Judith Bernstein 1

“In my work, there’s an awful lot of screaming to be heard.”

Oscar Ruiz Navia by Gary M. Kramer
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Graffiti, politics, and tracking shots.

Wendy White by EJ Hauser
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In Chinatown, NYC, where Wendy White lives, new signs go up over outdated signs, new awnings are installed over old ones, graffiti is painted over, windows become walls, additions are built, architecture is modified, buildings disappear … White has become a connoisseur of these visual shifts.

SAKRISTAN: Working the Streets by Rebecca Kaye
Sakristan Surpas Festival Body

Street Artist Raquel Sakristan on Dark Energy, defining consciousness, and not being afraid to disappear.

Cuckoo for Coco by Mary-Ann Monforton & Morris Shuman

Coco has a career that spans over 40 years, first as a 15-year-old “writer” on subway cars and later evolving into a studio artist employing stretched canvas. He is represented in Down by Law at Eric Firestone Gallery with three paintings selected from three different periods of his career. Each canvas has as its singular theme, various mutations of his tag, “coco.”

Two Books on Graffiti by Matthew Aaron Goodman
Article 4850 Grafitti   To C

What does it mean to paint your name someplace you’ve been—a heavily trafficked location or a highly visible object, like a train, that perpetually traverses an entire city? 

Alex Rubio by Bill Fitzgibbons
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Bill Fitzgibbons gives background information on Alex Rubio, the artist who created the cover image for this issue of BOMB, from Rubio’s upbringing in the San Antonio Barrio to his current pieces.

Carlos Reynoso: Diary of a Dissection by Laren Stover
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Carlos says he hates biographical details. 

Revenge of the Nerds by Gretchen Bender
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Equation for Mettropposttersizer by Rammellzee
Rammellzee

Abstract cosmic scene created with spray enamel and marker on a board, Equation for Mettropposttersizer by Rammellzee.

X-Acta Sketch by Futura 2000

X-Acta Sketch, a collage by Futura 2000.

Edouard Roditi by Bradford Morrow
Roditi 01 Body

Edouard Roditi was born in Paris 1910 of American parents. In 1929 he abandoned his studies of the Latin and Greek classics at Oxford and, until 1937, was associated with the Surrealist movement in Paris, as contributor to transition and as partner in Editions du Sagittaire, which published Andre Breton’s Surrealist manifestos and a number of books by Crevel, Desnos and Tzara.

Keith Haring by Tseng Kwong Chi

Photograph by Tseng Kwong Chi of Keith Haring creating a subway drawing.

Clinton Street: Olivier Mosset and Fred Brathwaite
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Olivier Mosset’s monochrome paintings became figurative walls for graffiti artist Fred Brathwaite. The two artists discuss their work’s purposeful and inherent intersections in “Clinton Street.”

Wild Style
Wild style

Hip Hop began at a time when the disco craze was reaching its peak. 

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