Film––History And Criticism

32 Articles
Sorted by
Metaphors on Vision by Stan Brakhage
Brakhage 2

A letter from Brakhage to the poet Robert Kelly describing his work on the groundbreaking film Mothlight.

Four Memories by Jonas Mekas
Jonas Mekas Dog 01

Disastrous screenings, Nam June Paik’s meeting with Bill Clinton, and time spent as a dog.

Portrait of the Artist as a Room by Lynne Sachs
Chris Marker 01

On Studio: Remembering Chris Marker

Hari Kunzru and Sjón
Hari Kunzru And Sjon

Ghost stories, paganism, the blues, and silent cinema are just some of the fixations of two authors known for novels steeped in history.

The Villain Is the 20th Century by William Corwin
Douglas Gordon Jonas Mekas 01

With I Had Nowhere to Go, director Douglas Gordon brings the diary of filmmaker and poet Jonas Mekas into contact with our own reveries.

Ross Lipman’s Notfilm by Liza Béar
111701479 06092016 Ross Lipman Bomb 1

Accurately described as a kino-essay by its maker, Notfilm is about Samuel Beckett’s Film, starring Buster Keaton, which Lipman restored digitally from the 1964 original.

The Imagination of Disaster by Andrew Durbin

On the second anniversary of the day Hurricane Sandy made landfall in New York, Klaus Biesenbach, the director of MoMA PS1, posted an image of the Statue of Liberty overrun by a tidal wave from the disaster movie The Day After Tomorrow to his Instagram, writing: “2 years ago #Sandy hit making clear how vulnerable the city is.”

Remembering Peter Hutton (1944–2016) by Joan Retallack
Peter Hutton Bomb1

Peter Hutton was an American filmmaker who spent many years of his youth at sea in the US Merchant Marine. His celebrated films, widely acclaimed for their luminous integrity, blurred the divide between still photography and cinema.

Lisa Immordino Vreeland by Anya Jaremko-Greenwold
Vreeland Bomb 04

“She wasn’t loved, so she didn’t know how to give love.”

Rachel Rose by Aily Nash
Rose Rachel 1

“I’m thinking about how we experience, or try to experience, infinite space and time through the most finite, basic methods.”

Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Selected Poetry, Edited and Translated by Stephen Sartarelli by Jonas Mekas
Bomb130 Mekas Pasolini New

That summer, that hot Roman summer afternoon, I see you sitting on the curb, waiting for the door to open, & seeing all those movies, yes, that hot Roman summer day.

Martha Stephens by Steve Macfarlane
Martha Stephens 01

Directing a comedic travelogue set in Iceland.

Paper Clip #69 by Ryan Sheldon
Dina Kelberman

Paper Clip is a weekly compilation of online articles, artifacts and other—old, new, and sometimes BOMB-related.

Paper Clip #25 by Tyler Curtis
1143 Sfinksi4040 Body

Paper Clip is a weekly compilation of online articles, artifacts and other—old, new, and sometimes BOMB-related.

Paper Clip #3 by Margie Cook
Brus 111

Paper Clip is a weekly compilation of online articles, artifacts and other—old, new, and sometimes BOMB-related.

Gerardo Naranjo and Nicolás Pereda
Nicolás Pereda 01

Pereda, a prolific minimalist, and Naranjo, known for his highly stylized portraits of disaffected youth, discuss their divergent styles, practices, and their shared “exile” from their native Mexico.

James Benning at Views From the Avant Garde by Colin Beckett
Twenty Cigarettes Body

James Benning’s Twenty Cigarettes blows smoke in the face of typical filmic portraiture. Colin Beckett explores the many dimensions of the film and its slippery subjects.

Geoff Dyer by Jonathan Lethem
Geoff Dyer

As the following dialogue will make clear, I’m a stone fan of Geoff Dyer, the mid-career British author who is our leading master of the undefinable memoir-essay-perambulation on diverse topics: jazz, D. H. Lawrence, photography, travel, drugs, sex, etcetera. 

Damaged Goods: Shock Value by ​Craig Hubert
Shockvalueblog Landing Page Body

Craig Hubert sits down with Jason Zinoman to discuss horror films’ capacity to enthrall, terrify, and addict audiences.

They Live by Justin McNeil
Theylive Body

“I’ve come here to chew bubblegum and kick ass. And I’m all out of bubblegum.” Justin McNeil reviews Jonathan Lethem’s non-fiction book,They Live, an examination of the movie of the same name.

No more results to load.
Nothing found—try broadening your search.