Conceptualism

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What Objects Can Do: on Jiro Takamatsu by William Corwin
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A new look at the actions, drawings, and sculpture of the late Japanese artist.

Tom Burr by Alan Ruiz
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“Some people are happy calling me an artist, others a Conceptual or post-Conceptual artist, others say sculptor, and others use a string of modifiers. Someone suggested once that I was simply performing these categories, which I like.”

Mayo Thompson by Keith Connolly
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“People discouraged me when I sang as a child, said, ‘You can’t carry a tune in a bucket.’ People still say that. Well, fuck it. I haven’t been trying to carry a tune. I’ve been essaying, expressing my interests in abstract terms, devil take the hindmost.”

R. H. Quaytman by Antonio Sergio Bessa
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On painting, architecture, and working in “chapters.”

Kate Durbin by Gabriela Jauregui
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Literary television, tragicomic starlets, and objects galore.

Coco Fusco by Elia Alba
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Being a provocateur, Planet of the Apes, and the “wow” factor of Cuban Art.

Shannon Ebner and Zoe Leonard
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Both artists overturn photographic conventions to slow down our reading of physical and verbal landscapes. Their exchange touches on the retina, the sun, and camera obscura.

Damnation by Christine Wertheim
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“To a small village, at the end of winter, comes a mysterious package addressed to no one.” Thus begins Damnation, Janice’s Lee’s new novella. 

Catherine Morris and Vincent Bonin’s Materializing Six Years: Lucy R. Lippard and the Emergence of Conceptual Art by Frances Richard
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Lucy R. Lippard collects the history of Conceptual Art in this polyphonic text.

Ulises Carrión’s The Poet’s Tongue
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One of Mexico’s most important conceptual artists, Ulises Carrión, is also one of the most overlooked. BOMB Senior Editor Mónica de la Torre is moved to child-speak over poems that might seem gibberish, but are instead Cage-like koans.

Gordon Monahan’s Seeing Sound: Sound Art, Performance, and Music, 1978–2011 by Nicolas Collins
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Gordon Monahan’s book, Seeing Sound, is a trilingual, experimental text which presents his catalog of work dating from 1978 to 2011.

Whiz Kid: Xylor Jane
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Away from the classroom and into the gallery space! Xylor Jane proves that artists get A’s in math, too.

Vanessa Place: Poetry and the Conceptualist Period by Andrea Quaid
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Andrea Quaid and Vanessa Place on the simultaneity, reflection, and transformation of conceptualism.

John Miller by Liam Gillick
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John Miller and Liam Gillick talk about repurposing painting, conceptualism, and reality TV.

Robert Fitterman and Vanessa Place’s Notes On Conceptualisms by Thom Donovan
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Robert Fitterman and Vanessa Place’s book Notes On Conceptualisms is one of the first books to take on the term “conceptualism” in relation to recent practices in contemporary poetry, offering a preliminary textbook on the subject.

Yves Klein: Air Architecture by Rachel Kushner
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In 1946 Yves Klein lay on the beach at Nice, an 18-year-old on an outing with friends.

James Welling by Devon Golden
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In spite of his six-foot-plus height, you might easily overlook James Welling in a crowded room. With his shaggy gray hair and tortoiseshell glasses, he looks every bit the UCLA tenured professor that he is. 

Vera Lutter by Peter Wollen
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According to most accounts, the camera obscura was developed in Europe during the 13th- and 14th-centuries, although versions of the device may have been used even earlier in China and the Arab world. 

Los Carpinteros by Trinie Dalton
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Los Carpinteros are a Cuban trio who create sculptures and large-scale public works all around the world. They have established their reputation as itinerant artists who juggle cultural assumptions by making architectural forms and structures that reflect upon our constructed cityscapes. 

Wade Guyton by Bill Arning
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Minimal in form, art-historically loaded, the work invited one to cut a rug while interdicting the pleasure with its massive intrusiveness.

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