Colonialism

26 Articles
Sorted by
Lidia Yuknavitch by Porochista Khakpour

Writing with the body as her touchstone, the novelist channels a woman warrior in The Book of Joan.

The Ruined Map by Steve Macfarlane
Lost City 01

Blunt yet intoxicating, James Gray’s The Lost City of Z betrays its outsize ambitions and pained revisionism with every last scene

Amitav Ghosh and Curt Stager
Ghosh And Stager Bomb 01

If novelists could tell the story of climate change, they might spark the action scientists are calling for in order to save the planet.

Vivien Goldman by Michael Patrick MacDonald
Goldman Bomb 2

“Dub was my sound because of postcolonial movements. I grew up in it. I bathed in it. I breathed it. So why shouldn’t it be mine?”

Naja Marie Aidt by Mieke Chew
Naja Marie Aidt Bomb 3

“Women in Denmark should be both women and men at the same time, but ‘men’ and ‘women’—what does that mean?”

Pedro Costa by Michael Guarneri
Costa 1

Documentary, realism, and life on the margins.

Samba Gadjigo and Jason Silverman by Pamela Cohn
Ousmane Sembene 1

A new documentary celebrates the great filmmaker Ousmane Sembène.

Rites of Spring by Lauren Bakst
Nora Chipaumire

Two recent interpretations of The Rite of Spring challenge the audience in new ways.

Jaime Manrique by Edith Grossman
Jaime Manrique By Ra L Jalube Body

“The tragedy of imperialism is that its dehumanizing machinery disrupts the cultures of the colonized. That’s why after imperial powers conquer a nation it sometimes takes centuries for the conquered to create cohesive civilizations again and to regain their identity.”

Miguel Gomes by Giovanni Marchini Camia
​Miguel Gomes

“Cinema has lost its youth.”

George Robert Minkoff’s The Leaves of Fate by Betsy Sussler
George Robert Minkoff 01

There is a curse upon the adventurers and mendicants, second sons of the aristocracy and would-be-sovereigns of their own destiny who sailed for the New World. Read about it in this review of The Leaves of Fate by George Robert Minkoff.

2010 Poetry Prize Winner, Judged by Susan Howe: Two Poems by Matthew Reeck

Intercepted Telegrams of a Man in a Tartan Shalwar Kameez

John Phillip Santos’s The Farthest Home Is in an Empire of Fire: A Tejano Elegy by Callie Enlow
John Philip Santos 01

In John Phillp Santos’ tale of his families origins from Spain, he sets out on a quest to discover his heritage and explores the human fascination with borders.

Carrie Mae Weems by Dawoud Bey
Carrie Mae Weems 01

In 1976 I had been making photographs for a couple of years. I had certainly been looking at a lot more photographs than I had actually made. 

Amitav Ghosh’s Sea of Poppies by Betsy Sussler
​Amitav Ghosh

Sea of Poppies is a miraculous book about even more than the 19th-century opium trade, which is an exciting tale in and of itself, fraught with voracious greed, power-mongering, and racism. 

A Book of Swoons by John Phillip Santos

1. Of the color of daylight in eternity

Yinka Shonibare by Anthony Downey
Shonibare 03

Yinka Shonibare first came to widespread attention through his use of Dutch wax fabric, which he has used both as the ground of his paintings and to clothe his sculptures. 

Tran Luong by Joe Fyfe
Luong 01

Joe Fyfe on how Tran Luong’s political past in Vietnam inspires healing in his performances and installations.

Paul Pfeiffer by Jennifer Gonzalez
Pfeiffer 01 Body

Winner of the Whitney Museum’s first Bucksbaum award in 2000, Paul Pfeiffer has received attention over the last few years for his provocative digital video production.

Coco Fusco’s The Bodies That Were Not Ours by Grady T. Turner
Coco Fusco 01

Contributing editor Coco Fusco’s second essay collection, The Bodies That Were Not Ours, demonstrates Fusco’s passion as an interviewer and interrogator of postcolonial legacies.

No more results to load.
Nothing found—try broadening your search.