Cartoons

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Jamian Juliano-Villani by Samuel Jablon
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“I’m not trying to make post-Internet paintings. What the fuck is post-Internet? It’s life.”

Bob Mankoff by Anya Jaremko-Greenwold
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“Humor teaches us that you can be a good person but also have bad thoughts.”

The Slanted Life of Emily Dickinson by Rosanna Bruno
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Amy Sillman by R. H. Quaytman
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I don’t remember when Amy and I first met—it must have been in the mid ’90s. However, I do remember that she saved my life by being one of the few artists who genuinely seemed to admire and enjoy what I was doing at a time when my work was barely known.

Joyce Pensato by Marcella Durand
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Joyce Pensato starts with the most iconic cartoon figures—Mickey, Minnie, Daffy, Krazy, Stan, and Homer—but her representations of them couldn’t be further from their usual plastic media.

Robert Brinker by Roberto Juarez
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Roberto Juarez on the way that Robert Brinker’s paper cutouts balance warm, Disney-like comfort with strident sensuality.

Ellen Berkenblit by Amy Sillman
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Amy Sillman on the delirious tension between knowing and not-knowing in the paintings of Ellen Birkenblit, whose new work is on view at Anton Kern Gallery through March 30.

Camille Rose Garcia by Ryan Nole
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An artists on artists text on Painter Camille Rose Garcia by Ryan Nole, accompanied by four paintings by Camille Rose Garcia, the first titled Antarctic Suburban Outpost.

Amid Amidi’s Cartoon Modern: Style and Design in Fifties Animation by Duncan Teater
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In Chicago, where I live, I can eat a cup of decent pea soup at a bakery across the street from the Richard J. Daley Center, a sharp steel and glass courthouse tower. 

Arturo Herrera by Josiah McElheny​
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Herrera’s use of profane materials—familiar, commonplace images—“contaminate” the carefully circumscribed world of the abstract.

Inka Essenhigh by Ross Bleckner
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Sometimes I see a new artist who is surprising because she brings certain images and qualities to painting. Inka Essenhigh’s images span a range from funky and cartoony to elegant, like science fiction rendered into Ming Dynasty decoration, Chinoise screens, or lacquered bowls. 

Melissa Marks by Betsy Sussler
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Melissa Marks’s character Volitia cavorts through her drawings with the impudence of Nabokov’s Lolita and the sly pleasure of a cherub. 

Billy Copley by Mimi Thompson
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Inside Billy Copley’s subconscious, cartoon characters, declarative statements, and phonetic alphabets battle for attention.

Keith Mayerson by Bill Arning
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Keith Mayerson is hard to pin down. Just when you have a handle on his work, he shifts in some unforeseeable but intuitively right way. He made a splash in 1994 with a 60-plus drawing suite retelling the story of Pinocchio from a queer perspective.

Elliott Green by Saul Ostrow
Elliott Green 01

Parades have complex social and psychological agendas and the same can be said for their participants.

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