British Culture

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Paul Kingsnorth’s Beast by Tyler Curtis
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The Wake—Paul Kingsnorth’s 2014 debut novel, which chronicles the life of an Anglo-Saxon during the Norman Conquest—has since gained a disturbing resonance with the recent surge and codification of nationalism that is Brexit.

Geoff Dyer by Ryan Chapman
Geoff Dyer Luxor Statues Two Angles

“I’m glad that the work is still proving elusive enough to resist attempts to gather it all up in a critical hamper or net.”

Vivien Goldman by Michael Patrick MacDonald
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“Dub was my sound because of postcolonial movements. I grew up in it. I bathed in it. I breathed it. So why shouldn’t it be mine?”

William Fowler by Pamela Cohn
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Restoring, archiving, and exhibiting artists‘ films from the post-punk era.

Magnus Mills by Michael Barron
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As novelist and bus driver, Mills discusses The Maintenance of Headway, vinyl puritans, and the history of England.

Richard Dawson by Cian Nugent
Richard Dawson

On being nothing, looking outward, and the obstinant relevance of that popular art form, song.

D. Nurkse, Part II by Howard Altmann
D Nurkse

In part two of a two part interview, Howard Altmann talks to poet D. Nurkse about his ruthless youth, the astonishing nature of snails, and teaching at Riker’s Island.

D. Nurkse, Part I by Howard Altmann
D Nurkse

In part one of a two part interview, Howard Altmann talks to poet D. Nurkse about growing up in Brooklyn, Oedipal fantasies, and working in a factory.

Children of the Sun by B.C. Edwards
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B.C. Edwards reviews Max Schaefer’s Children of the Sun which is absolutely not a book about gay British neo-Nazis

Michael Frayn by Marcy Kahan
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“One of the things about the theater, and fiction, is that you can play. You can actually investigate situations that don’t exist.”

Sam Taylor-Wood by Bruce Ferguson
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On the crest of the new British invasion, Sam Taylor-Wood’s surprising photographs and films catch their subjects in isolated moments, dramas, arguments. Her work is reminiscent of early Warhol, with an operatic style all her own.

Tibor Fischer’s The Collector Collector by Jenifer Berman
​Tibor Fischer

A storytelling bowl with the selective ability to change size and shape, to grow eight feet high, to repair itself when shattered, to save its unlucky possessor from harm’s way. 

Kula Shaker: Retroculture by Lynn Geller
​Kula Shaker

A friend of mine once conjectured, What if the ’60s weren’t an era, but a place one could still visit?

Graham Swift by Betsy Sussler
Graham Swift

Written in the voices of the residents of Bermondsey, Graham Swift’s Last Orders (Knopf) captures the language of this working class neighborhood on the outskirts of London, just as Carver caught his characters’ mute eloquence, and Faulkner found his locals’ wise, wry humor.

Mike Leigh by Bette Gordon
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Filmmaker and BOMB contributing editor Bette Gordon speaks to acclaimed director Mike Leigh upon the release of his award-winning 1993 film, Naked.

Teeth. by Max Blagg

I love the shiny, pristine teeth that most Americans keep behind their lips, pearly immaculate rows of ivory, often capped in precious metals, brilliant they seem and impervious to decay, and their children’s teeth, wrapped in steel for years so they too, will grow in straight and flawless. 

Peter Ackroyd by Patrick McGrath
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Self-proclaimed “martyr to fiction” Peter Ackroyd gushes about his terminal Anglophilia.

Graham Swift by Patrick McGrath
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Waterland, first published In England in 1983, established Graham Swift as one of the more original, elegant, and imaginatively fertile of the younger English writers. Patrick McGrath talks to him about his work in a cold house off the Fulham Road.

Janet Hobhouse by Bruce Wolmer
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Janet Hobhouse discusses her various books with Bruce Wolmer — NovemberDancing in the Dark and Everybody Who Was Anybody: A Biography of Gertrude Stein—and the differences between “American” and “English” writing.

Graham Swift by Patrick McGrath
Swift01 Body

Waterland, first published In England in 1983, established Graham Swift as one of the more original, elegant, and imaginatively fertile of the younger English writers. Patrick McGrath talks to him about his work in a cold house off the Fulham Road

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