Assemblage

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Intimate Variations: Other Romances at Rachel Uffner Gallery by Katherine Brewer Ball
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Extending the possibilities of relation.

What Objects Can Do: on Jiro Takamatsu by William Corwin
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A new look at the actions, drawings, and sculpture of the late Japanese artist.

Portfolio by David Gilbert
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Suburban sprawl and craft-store spree meet creeping apocalyptic bleakness.

Lynda Benglis by Federica Bueti
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The eminent artist discusses her materials, “frozen gestures,” and the illusion of form.

Alina Tenser by Rachel Valinsky
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“Oh, obviously my leg sticking out from underneath the tray needs to stay.”

Nicole Cherubini by Sarah Braman
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Cherubini describes her lush, material-based approach to clay and glaze as “baroque minimalism.” Braman visited Cherubini’s Brooklyn Navy Yard studio as she prepared for her fall exhibition at the Pérez Art Museum Miami.

Lynda Benglis: Beyond Process by Stuart Horodner
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Susan Richmond’s new book about Lynda Benglis, Beyond Process, examines the work and critical reception of the artist, who moved from Louisiana to New York in 1964. It is not an exhaustive assessment, but in 150 citation-packed pages, Richmond thoughtfully examines the artist’s motives and methods during the past five decades.

Abraham Cruzvillegas by Haegue Yang
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Before I met Abraham Cruzvillegas, more than once I’d heard curator Clara Kim mention in passing that he was a special person. This piqued my curiosity.

Katie Bell by John O'Connor
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For the past year I’ve worked in a studio adjacent to Katie Bell’s, at the Marie Walsh Sharpe Foundation. 

Tamara Zahaykevich by B. Wurtz
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Mies van der Rohe’s statement “God is in the details” came to mind recently as I was thinking about Tamara Zahaykevich’s work.

Phoebe Washburn by Abby Goldstein
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Entering the Downtown gallery housing of Phoebe Washburn’s installation Nunderwater Nort Lab you are greeted by a curved wall made of two-by-fours.

R. M. Fischer by Daniel Wiener
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R. M. Fischer, the sculptor known in the ’80s and ’90s for creating lamps from wholesale kitchen equipment and various fasteners, has more recently started making work that is wild and funky—vinyl cloth sewn together with ever-so-visible seams. 

Charles Goldman by B. Wurtz
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B. Wurtz on the ambiguousness sculptor Charles Goldman aims for between “where his art ends and the rest of the world begins.”

Barrão by Tunga
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Each Vessel is every vessel, and, simultaneously a unique on in itself.

Gedi Sibony by Anthony Huberman
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Anthony Huberman on how Gedi Sibony’s sculptures toy with our assumptions and thus serve the purpose of humor.

Jon Kessler by Saul Ostrow
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Saul Ostrow on how Jon Kessler’s sculptures and installations explore the aesthetic and the role of technology and mass media in our lives.

John Newman by Laurie Simmons
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Laurie Simmons on the fun, worldly sculptures of John Newman.

Dieter Roth: Roth Time by Marjorie Welish
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If there is any one thing that distinguishes Dieter Roth’s anarchic dadaist assemblages from all else that has come on the scene since, it is that their inflection of a radical practice is coextensive with Roth’s own life.

Diana Cooper by Shirley Kaneda & Saul Ostrow
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Diana Cooper’s work is a high-wire act.

Sarah Sze by Judith Hudson
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Sarah Sze pulled back the skin of a wall at PS1 and ripped out its guts. She created a pulsing, dripping universe precariously holding onto life like a dissected frog. 

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