African Diaspora

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Harmony Holiday by Farid Matuk
Miles Davis Trumpets

“I don’t want the kind of career where everything is sensible and safe; I’d rather suffer through the anxiety of wondering where I’m going next than suffer the boredom of dancing in the same safe square.”

James Little by LeRonn P. Brooks
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“The reward is getting through the tough stuff. And that’s what’s perplexing about the art thing. When I was going to school there were kids that could draw their asses off. There were kids that were better draftsman than me, for certain. But no one was more determined than me.”

Portfolio by Azikiwe Mohammed
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Potential Futures / Black Receipts

Njideka Akunyili Crosby by Erica Ando
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From Lagos to LA, a young painter’s images resonate with meaning, both personal and political.

Simone Leigh’s The Waiting Room by Terence Trouillot
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For her residency at the New Museum, Leigh looks at the act of healing through the lens of black female caregivers, educators, and intellectuals.

BOMB Specific: Jungle Fever by Pascale Marthine Tayou

Pacale Marthine Tayou is a Cameroonian artist based in Belgium. His work has appeared in documenta11 (2002) in Kassel, two Venice Biennales (2005 and 2009), and numerous international exhibitions. Recent solo exhibitions took place at the Serpentine Galleries, London, and Fowler Museum, Los Angeles, both in 2015.

Eldzier Cortor by Terry Carbone
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“I’m fighting between control and letting nature take its course.”

Céline Sciamma by Steve Macfarlane
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Cinematic choreography and the art of showing, not telling.

Bradford Young by Sarah Salovaara
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Black Nationalism, rural Brooklyn, faces, and monoliths.

Aby Ngana Diop’s Liital by Boima Tucker
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This is the type of record that will slap cultural essentialists in the face.

LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs & Morgan Parker by Virginia McLure
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Dutty Wine, radical action, phrase books, voices on television, and America’s orphaned tongue.

Wangechi Mutu by Deborah Willis
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“The collage works are going to be life-size. My work increased in scale when I realized that I wanted people to enter the worlds or to see them almost like dioramas— these places that they could be immersed into, with their own social structures and their eco-systems.”

Radcliffe Bailey by Lilly Lampe
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Radcliffe Bailey on artistic and regional labels, testing his own DNA, aging, and the power familial ancestry holds on his practice.

Binyavanga Wainaina by Rob Spillman
Binyavanga Wainaina

Kenyan writer Binyavanga Wainaina is inexhaustible, a public intellectual very much engaged with the literary and political worlds. His memoir, One Day I Will Write About This Place, published this July by Graywolf Press, chronicles the multiplicity of his middle-class African childhood: home squared, we call it, your clan, your home, the nation of your origin.

Inner Views, Zwelethu Mthethwa, Studio Museum in Harlem by Patricia Spears Jones
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An exhibition of photographs from three series, exploring absence, decomposition and dislocation. Shot in Cape Town and New Orleans, subjects vary from migrants in their intimate spaces, empty beds, and ruined houses.

Carrie Mae Weems by Dawoud Bey
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In 1976 I had been making photographs for a couple of years. I had certainly been looking at a lot more photographs than I had actually made. 

Junot Díaz by Edwidge Danticat
​Junot Díaz

If Marvel Comics had gotten around to it, Oscar Wao would have been a hero. As it is, Junot Díaz stepped in and made him one first.

Nuruddin Farah by Kwame Anthony Appiah

I can’t remember where I first met Nuruddin Farah, but it was at some sort of conference. 

Erna Brodber by Keshia Abraham
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Reading Dr. Erna Brodber’s novel Myal (New Beacon Books, 1988) is a transformative experience that unchains both truths and memories and moves you to explore what she calls the “half that’s not been told.” 

Christopher Cozier by Annie Paul
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