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ASUNA’s 100 Keyboards by Jacob Gordon
Naoyuki Arashi crouches over multiple keyboards at his American debut.
ASUNA’s 100 Keyboards by Jacob Gordon
Naoyuki Arashi crouches over multiple keyboards at his American debut.
Zachary Lazar’s The Apartment on Calle Uruguay by Sophie Poole
Cover of Zachary Lazar’s The Apartment on Calle Uruguay.
David Coles’s Chromatopia: An Illustrated History of Color by Sabine Russ
Cover of David Coles’ Chromatopia: An Illustrated History of Color
Hasanthika Sirisena’s Dark Tourist: Essays by Ilana Masad
The cover of Hasanthika Sirisena’s Dark Tourist: Essays from Mad Creek Books.
Painting Is a Supreme Fiction: Writings by Jesse Murry, 1980–1993 by Sheryl Oppenheim
A spread from of painted notebook pages with handwritten words on “of sky and mind” on the left page.
Richard Peete and Robert Yapkowitz’s Karen Dalton: In My Own Time by Jason Diamond
●	Karen Dalton playing acoustic guitar on a lawn, with a cigarette in her mouth.
Amy Ruhl’s Between Tin Men by Amber Power
Frosting on a person’s mouth and tongue.
Hannah Wilke: Art for Life’s Sake by Jenny Wu
Postcard of a seashore with kneaded erasers arranged over the water and sky.

The retrospective of Hannah Wilke’s career “invites viewers to notice the overlooked details in Wilke’s works, so they can fully embrace the pleasures and contradictions that linger beneath—and, at times, explicitly atop—their surfaces.”

Gregg Bordowitz’s Some Styles of Masculinity by Svetlana Kitto
Gregg Bordowitz speaking into a microphone from an auditorium stage.

With references rangeing from Lou Reed to the Talmud, activist and writer Gregg Bordowitz’s improvisational lecture considers “whiteness, Jewish humor and mysticism, the ongoing AIDS crisis, and diaspora itself. You know, the light stuff.”

R. Kikuo Johnson’s No One Else by Lee Lai
The cover art for R. Kikuo Johnon's No One Else: a motorboat on a trailer in backyard in front of a fence with flames rising beyond.

R. Kikuo Johnson’s third graphic novel is a “meditative and melancholy story that’s nevertheless bristling with energy and dry humor.”

Tamara Shopsin’s LaserWriter II by Stanley Moss
Cover art from LaserWriter II by Tamara Shopsin

Illustrator and memoirist Tamara Shopsin’s debut novel is set in TekServe, the iconic Mac repair shop of the 1990s, and is populated by geeks, celebrity cameos, and anthropomorphized machine parts.

Myriam J. A. Chancy’s What Storm, What Thunder by Walter Greene
Cover art for Myriam J A Chancy's What Storm What Thunder

Myriam J. A. Chancy’s eighth book follows eleven people whose lives were upended by the catastrophic earthquake that struck Haiti in 2010.

Lincoln Michel’s The Body Scout by Seth Fried
Cover Art The Body Scout Lincoln Michel

Lincoln Michel’s debut novel is a surreal sci-fi noir investigating a scandalous death in a futuristic, pharmaceutical-fueled baseball league.

Les Filles de Illighadad’s At Pioneer Works by Nina Katchadourian
Three women (two carrying guitars) and one man walking through an empty square

Les Filles de Illighadad’s music is driven by three guitars but remains free from the “tyranny of the solo.”

Chris McKim’s Wojnarowicz: F**k You F*ggot F**ker by Eugenie Dalland
Three buffaloes tumble off the side of a cliff.

Wojnarowicz: F**k You F*ggot F**ker (World of Wonder) a documentary by Chris McKim, pays tribute David Wojnarowicz, capturing the care and ferocity of the AIDS activist and artist.

Rosine Mbakam’s Delphine’s Prayers by Priscilla Posada
An image of Delphine. She is looking to the side and touching her hair wrap.

Rosine Mbaka’s film Delphine’s Prayers (Tândor Films) documents her friend—a fellow Cameroonian immigrant in Brussels—as she reckons with the aftermath of sexual violence.

Nanfu Wang’s In the Same Breath by Bridget Hovell
A crowd of people looking forward. Many are wearing red and holding China's flag. All of them are wearing masks.

Nanfu Wang’s documentary In the Same Breath (HBO) chronicles the COVID-19 pandemic, its paradoxical propaganda, and how China and the US “responded to the spread of the coronavirus by protecting their public image above all else.”

Elisa Shua Dusapin’s Winter in Sokcho by Cecilia Barron
An image of the cover of Winter in Sokcho, mimicking a postcard from Sokcho. A quote from ELLE reads: "I haven't encountered a voice like this since Marguerite Duras–spellbinding."

Elisa Shua Dusapin’s debut novel, Winter in Sokcho, transports us to the off-season in a resort town near the North Korean border.

Matthew Soules’s Icebergs, Zombies, and the Ultra Thin: Architecture and Capitalism in the Twenty-First Century by Deborah Gans
An aerial view of 111 West 57th Street featuring an extremely tall, skinny building on the edge of Central Park.

Matthew Soules’s Icebergs, Zombies, and the Ultra Thin looks at how finance-driven architecture is disrupting cities “not through gentrification but rather through zombification.”

Alex Quicho’s Small Gods by Esmé Hogeveen
Quicho Cover

From weapons of war to their artistic applications, Alex Quicho’s book Small Gods takes a comprehensive look at drones in the 21st century.

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