Discover MFA Programs in Art and Writing

BOMB 81 Fall 2002

BOMB 081
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Interviews
Jane Hammond by David Lehman

Collaboration between poets and their peers in poetry and painting is a crucial element of modernism and of avant-garde art in general, and it’s a prized feature of the New York School. 

Walid Ra’ad by Alan Gilbert
Walid Ra'ad 01

Even though—or perhaps because—it’s such a small country, Lebanon has been swept up in a number of major geopolitical encounters over the past 200 years.

Martina Kudláček by Robert Gardner
Kudlacek 01 Body

I should begin by saying I am always looking for films that support the notion that there is, as has been said by more than one influential writer on the documentary, the possibility of a creative use of actuality. 

Mahmoud Darwish by Raja Shehadeh
Darwish 01 Body

Mahmoud Darwish was the 2001 winner of the Lannan Prize for Cultural Freedom. He is considered one of the foremost poets of the Arab world. 

Jeffrey Eugenides by Jonathan Safran Foer

I’ve known Jeffrey Eugenides for several years and in several contexts—first as one of his readers, then as a student of his at Princeton, and now as a friend

Steve Reich and Beryl Korot by Julia Wolfe
Reich 01 Body

One stormy night this summer in New York, I trekked over to Steve Reich and Beryl Korot’s place to see and hear their new video opera, Three Tales

Christopher Shinn by David Greenspan
Shinn 01 Body

Christopher Shinn and I spoke over the phone and decided we’d have our conversation at New Dramatists, where we’re both member playwrights. Because it’s summer, the building is relatively quiet and relatively air-conditioned. 

Artists on Artists
Caio Fonseca by Peter Elley
Fonseca 01 Body

Peter Elley on how the artist Caio Fonseca and his paintings transcend business-as-usual in the art world.

Emily Eveleth by ​Betsy Sussler​
Eveleth Toc 1

Betsy Sussler on the wide-ranging sexual innuendo of Emily Eveleth’s paintings.

The Orchard Group by Janet Olmsted Cross
Orchardgroup 01

Janet Olmsted Cross on the bold, tough building designs of the Orchard Group.

Lenore Malen by Jonathan Ames
Malen 01 Body

Story of a haunted, wounded lover by Jonathan Ames with photographic work by Lenore Malen.

First Proof
A Man Ugly, Strong and Proper, or Narciso Reyes, You Are My Destiny by Sandra Cisneros

This First Proof contains an excerpt from Caramelo.

Three Poems by Gershom Scholem

This First Proof contains the poems “Jerusalem,” “The Sirens,” and “Greetings from Angelus (Paul Klee Angelus Novus).” Translated by Richard Sieburth.

L’eau étrangère by Silvia Baron Supervielle

from L’eau étrangère (1993)

there beyond

The Chinese Sun by Arkadii Dragomoshchenko

This First Proof contains an excerpt from “The Chinese Sun.” Translated by Evgeny Pavlov.

A Lake Sequence by Scott Graham

Hear me, Lord, please contain me. 
I was in flames the time you poured
the wind down through the cradlesof my blue ears, when you rattled
the brittle palms lovely in my ears.

Four Poems by Luis Eduardo López

This First Proof contains the poems “57th X-ing,” “58th X-ing,” “59th X-ing,” and “60th X-ing.”

Midday by Matilde Daviu

This First Proof contains the story “Midday.” Translated by Margaret Carson.

The Book of John by Jenifer Berman

This First Proof contains an excerpt from “The Book of John.”

Four Poems by Patricia Spears Jones

This First Proof contains the poems “Back when Roberta was the same age as Lucille,” “Valentine’s Day, 2001,” “Sea Serpent,” and “Comfort and Joy.”

Editor's Choice
Josh Müller by Lucy Raven
​Josh Müller 01

Artist Josh Müller uses a variety of methods to draw into question how audiences interpret film, from resetting and rephotographing travel magazine models to taping a rescreening of a popular television series.

Chie Fueki by Laura Newman
Chie Fueki 01

Chie Fueki’s paintings are both shimmeringly beautiful and richly meaningful, offering many layers of interpretation and allusion and drawing on roots as disparate as Jasper Johns and Japanese bijinga painting.

Rebecca Miller’s Personal Velocity by Susan Shacter
Rebecca Miller 01

Personal Velocity, starring Kyra Sedwick, Parker Posey, and Fairuza Balk, is director/screenwriter Rebecca Miller’s depiction of three adult women trying to regain their lost selves.

Múm’s Finally We Are No One by Eric David Johnson
​Múm 01

Reviewer and DJ Eric David Johnson recommends Múm’s latest CD Finally We Are No Onefor painters and others looking for an album that perfectly combines musical absence and presence, like a music box in a dream.

Art Cuba: The New Generation by Holly Block by Rachel Kushner
Art Cuba 01

Holly Block’s survey of contemporary Cuban art highlights artists, such as González, Álvarez, and Suarez, who neither explicitly support Castro’s reign nor obviously oppose it, but find a middle ground of artistic expression.

Jenny Lynn Penberthy’s Lorine Niedecker: Collected Works by Matthea Harvey

Penberthy’s collection of the poetry of Lorine Niedecker draws reviewer Matthea Harvey’s attention to the discourses these poems establish with poetic movements, such as the Objectivists, and particular historical figures, such as Emaneul Swedenborg.

John Coplans’s A Body by Martin Heiferman
John Coplans 01

In A Body, John Coplans confronts his readers with black-and-white self-portraits of his own 82-year-old frame.

Frederic Tuten’s The Green Hour by Eric Kraft

Frederic Tuten’s novel The Green Hour portrays protagonist Dominique’s twin obsessions: with the painter Poussin and with her sometimes-lover Rex.

Lynne Tillman’s This Is Not It by Nell McClister
Francine Prose’s The Lives of the Muses: Nine Women and the Artists They Inspired by Victoria Ludwin
The Lives of the Muses 01

Employing intrigue and depth, Francine Prose examines both the artistic partnerships and the personal lives of nine female artistic inspirations, from Rossetti’s Elizabeth Siddel to Balanchine’s Suzanne Farrell.

More
So Long I Can’t Remember, no. 6 by Emily Eveleth
Emily Eveleth 01
Poets of the Levant by Lee Smith

A decade ago, with the 500th anniversary of Columbus’s voyage to the New World, a lively academic debate centered on whether the date should be celebrated, or, for all that the New World’s native inhabitants had suffered, remembered in mourning.