New York Live Arts presents

Marjani Forte
Nov 15-19


BOMB 136 Summer 2016

BOMB 136 Cover
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Interviews

Vince Staples by Simone White

“Life has a soundtrack. And certain music is a soundtrack to a certain type of identity or feeling. 50 Cent, the Game, and those kinds of guys—they made us feel like our lives were worth nothing, basically.”

Wadada Leo Smith by John Corbett
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“I think that creative improvisation music models the democratic principle. Heads of state and legislative bodies could learn a lot from this practice.”

Patricia Treib by Joe Fyfe
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“Every time you remember something, it’s not like you’re being teleported to the past—you’re actually physically experiencing it in the present.”

Dmitry Krymov by John Freedman
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“I asked my students for the image of the essence of tenderness. One girl brought in a small, silver plate with a bunch of grapes neatly laid out on it. When I noticed she had stripped the skin off the grapes, I got goose bumps.”

Jesse Ball & Catherine Lacey
Jesse Ball And Catherine Lacey

“I had a guy come up to me and say, ‘I think you’re a really good writer; I just think you’re wrong about a lot of things. But I enjoy the books.’”

Lee Clay Johnson by Jay Varner
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“I think violence is inherited, it’s taught, and some of the characters are born into bad blood. …The characters are raped and so is the land.”

Jason Simon by Claire Pentecost
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“Liberty’s show manages to be about prison and not about prison at the same time: her audience writes about how the music lets them forget they’re incarcerated for a moment, and she calls that effect ‘time travel.’”

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun by Ammiel Alcalay
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“I’m a nontraditionalist being a traditionalist creating nontraditional art, which means that I’m just making art.”

First Proof
Malcolm Lowry in the Supermarket by Daniel Saldaña París

There are cities more present in the warp and weft of literature than others; that’s clear. The literary prestige of New York, Paris, or Mexico City is both undeniable and well-deserved: certain books, once read, transform forever the faces of those cities, superimposing a layer of fiction on their sidewalks and traffic signals.

Hog for Sorrow by Leopoldine Core

Lucy and Kit sat waiting side by side on a black leather couch, before a long glass window that looked out over Tribeca, the winter sun in their laps. Kit stole sideward glances at Lucy, who hummed, twisting her hair around her fingers in a compulsive fashion.

Two Poems by John Yau

My genitals aren’t worth listening to / Chinatown smells like brown cheese

Carver & Cobain by David Means

A few years ago, I drafted two linked stories, one about Kurt Cobain and the other about Raymond Carver. Both grew up in the Pacific Northwest. Both had fathers who worked at a sawmill. Both were, in one way or another, working-class kids. 

Four Poems by Mary Jo Bang

In any narrative, facts are present or not. One might assume the more facts, the better the constructed history, since facts are meant to reflect what can’t be computed by storytelling alone, which is said to be subjective and therefore inaccurate.

Three Poems by Peter Gizzi

You wonder summer’s terabyte, / here on the terra forming, / floating and atomizing, / giving over to shadow,

Portfolio by Steel Stillman
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The Imagination of Disaster by Andrew Durbin

On the second anniversary of the day Hurricane Sandy made landfall in New York, Klaus Biesenbach, the director of MoMA PS1, posted an image of the Statue of Liberty overrun by a tidal wave from the disaster movie The Day After Tomorrow to his Instagram, writing: “2 years ago #Sandy hit making clear how vulnerable the city is.”

Artists on Artists

David Brody by Elliott Green

David Brody has discovered a way to improvise abstraction with the help of math, producing exaggerated perspectives that make you feel the excitement of flying. The flight path might be up or down—depending on where you look—over familiar yet impossible imaginary places.

Frederick Terna by Stephen Westfall
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In 1943, at the age of twenty, Frederick Terna knew that if he survived the war he was going to be a painter. 

Brandan “Bmike” Odums by Zachary Lazar
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After Hurricane Katrina, Brandan “Bmike” Odums realized that the graffiti he and other artists were making in the abandoned buildings around New Orleans had an inherent political value, not just because of the subject matter (though Odums himself had always had an affinity for depicting civil-rights icons) but also because creating art in those depopulated spaces foregrounded their meaning, calling attention to what they had once been, what they had been allowed to become, and why.

Rebecca Smith by John Newman
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When I walked through the doors of the Hionas Gallery to see Rebecca Smith’s exhibition, there was one white wall piece that seemed to hover in front of a white wall. It was nothing if not quietly but palpably breathtaking. It made the room feel complete; it beckoned me closer… and thrillingly, there was nothing to say!

Editor's Choice
Two Books by C.D. Wright by Ariana Reines
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I saw C.D. Wright at a party once. I wasn’t her friend or her student. She was beautiful and graceful; something girlish about her face under the white hair.

Institutional Collusion: Merlin Carpenter and Cologne’s “Non-Productive Attitude” by David Everitt Howe

It’s very tricky, if not kind of futile, to criticize the work of Merlin Carpenter; he does it for you before you’ve even had the chance, calling his art “crap political work.”

Jackie Sibblies Drury’s Really by Ratik Asokan
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A play that updates European absurdist techniques to take aim at liberal America’s great existential troubles: race and gender.

Alice Birch’s Revolt. She Said. Revolt Again. by Amber Power
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This guide is for women who feel that they will soon be engaged in a new revolution to overthrow the soul-crushing social codes that govern their sexual, professional, and familial lives. 

Javier Téllez’s To Have Done with the Judgment of God by Silvia Benedetti
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Venezuelan-born artist Javier Téllez’s first exhibition at Koenig & Clinton took its title from his recent film To Have Done with the Judgment of God (2016) and concerns an experience that marked Antonin Artaud’s life in 1936: the author’s encounter with the Rarámuri community living in the Sierra Tarahumara in northwest Mexico.

Ross Lipman’s Notfilm by Liza Béar
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Accurately described as a kino-essay by its maker, Notfilm is about Samuel Beckett’s Film, starring Buster Keaton, which Lipman restored digitally from the 1964 original.

More

BOMB Specific: Jungle Fever by Pascale Marthine Tayou

Pacale Marthine Tayou is a Cameroonian artist based in Belgium. His work has appeared in documenta11 (2002) in Kassel, two Venice Biennales (2005 and 2009), and numerous international exhibitions. Recent solo exhibitions took place at the Serpentine Galleries, London, and Fowler Museum, Los Angeles, both in 2015.

End Page by David Horvitz
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A new work produced exclusively for BOMB.