New York Live Arts presents

Marjani Forte
Nov 15-19


BOMB 132 Summer 2015

139125856 07062015 Bomb 132 Cover
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Interviews

Nicole Eisenman and David Humphrey

The painters discuss facial symmetry and mirror neurons, the interplay between image and texture, and their shared interest in storytelling through figuration.

Carolee Schneemann by Coleen Fitzgibbon
Carolee Schneemann 01 Bomb 132

Breaking the Frame, a film by Marielle Nitoslawska about Schneemann’s unique legacy, serves as a departure point for an exchange about the “beauty paradox,” historical and contemporary patriarchies, and the artist’s ongoing subversion of gender codes.

Maggie Nelson by A.L. Steiner
A L  Steiner 1

“What expression isn’t a negotiation of some sort?”

Justin Vivian Bond by Joy Episalla
Justin Vivian Bond 1

Bond keeps expanding a performative repertoire that’s equally personal and political. On the occasion of V’s gallery exhibit in London, Episalla queries the self-designated “trans-genre artist.”

Leigh Ledare by Chris Kraus
Leigh Ledare 1

Leigh Ledare’s projects involve interpersonal triangulations in which the camera plays a crucial role and all parties, viewers included, are implicated. Upon A.R.T. Press’s publication of a book-length dialogue between him and Rhea Anastas, Ledare revisits recent works with novelist Chris Kraus.

Robert Grenier and Paul Stephens
​CAMBRIDGE M'ASS Robert Grenier

CAMBRIDGE M’ASS, originally published by Lyn Hejinian’s Tuumba Press in 1979, marked Robert Grenier’s shift to visual poetry. Celebrating its recent reprint, Paul Stephens talks with him about the oversize poster-poem, where poetry is both map and maze.

Moriah Evans by Lawrence Kumpf
Moriah Evans 01 Bomb 132

An interest in disobedient bodies notwithstanding, for Moriah Evans dance emerges through rigorous choreographic structures. Her most recent piece, Social Dance, was presented at ISSUE Project Room earlier this year.

BOMB Specific

BOMB Specific by Lyle Ashton Harris

Lyle Ashton Harris’s work explores intersections between the personal and the political, examining the impact of ethnicity, gender, and desire on the contemporary social and cultural dynamic.

Artists on Artists
Sam Messer by Mary Reid Kelley
Messer 01

Siddhartha Gautama
Grew rather stout from a 
Devotion unremitting
To sitting.

Caroline Woolard by John Haskell
Woolard 01

Artists generally fall into two groups: the makers (of objects) and doers (of activities). They survive, more or less, on the largesse of the art world. 

Lauren Bakst and Yuri Masnyj
Lauren Bakst Yuri Masnyj 01 Bomb 132

A conditional archive or A score
for the past and future of
LIVING ROOM INDEX AND POOL

First Proof
From Flow Chart Illuminated by John Ashbery & Archie Rand
Archie Rand John Ashbery 01 Bomb 132

Images by Archie Rand with excerpts from John Ashbery’s FLOW CHART,

Chronicles of Nueva York (El Bar Stonewall) by Pedro Lemebel

So they invite you to Nueva York, all expenses paid, to participate in an event for Stonewall, twenty years after the police brawl starring the gay girls who, in 1964, took over a bar in the Village. 

Excerpt from White Time by Bernadette Van-Huy

The very first days following my mother’s death, my father and I were alone. 

Olympia by Robert Walser

I wrote: “Do permit me to address a letter to you.”

Assholes and Oxheads by Will Heinrich

“Dear Aaron,” writes Henry. “The first thing I realized was that I didn’t want to be out of touch, and the next thing I realized was that I had no one left but you to be in touch with.

Three Poems by Arthur Solway

He spoke of neighborhood thieves and his passion for a singer / whose name we’ve long forgotten.

Evolution by Eileen Myles

Something / unearthly / about / today / so I buy / a Diet Coke & / a newspaper / a version of “me”

Three Poems by Laura Mullen

This vagueness in the air / Shifts / Thin then / To the point of blankness

Editor's Choice

Raphael Rubinstein’s The Miraculous by Anthony Graves

An illustrious French intellectual once called for a moratorium on the authorial attribution of texts. 

Samantha Gorman and Danny Cannizzaro’s Pry by John Cayley
Samantha Gorman Danny Cannizzaro 01 Pry

As the title of a literary publication, this word—Pry—must serve as a kind of invitation, an invitation to read.

Walerian Borowczyk’s Obscure Pleasures and Other Polish Films by Peter Dudek
Walerian Borowczyk 01 Bomb 132

Over the past two years I’ve been captivated by the work of Polish filmmakers. 

Badlands Unlimited’s New Lovers Series by Mónica de la Torre​
Badlands 01 Bomb 132

You don’t have to be a connoisseur of erotica to recognize its tropes: wet, swelling pussies; budding breasts; hot, tight holes; massive rods … Do they seem all the more worn-out because they’re aimed at conveying sexual stamina?

Anne Garréta’s Sphinx, Translated by Emma Ramadan by Tyler Curtis
Anne Garreta 01 Bomb 132

Though she wouldn’t join the Oulipo for another fourteen years, Anne Garréta’s 1986 novel, Sphinx, is quintessentially Oulipian.

Dorothy Iannone’s You Who Read Me With Passion Now Must Forever Be My Friends, Edited by Lisa Pearson, with Essay By Trinie Dalton by Christine Wertheim
Dorothy Iannone

What’s in a name? Take Douglas Sirk’s film Imitation of Life or Christina Stead’s novel For Love Alone—these are exemplary names, for they give precise definition to their objects, the works they denote.

Shelley Marlow’s Two Augusts in a Row in a Row by Kevin Killian
Shelley Marlow 01 Bomb 132

Brooklyn-based Shelley Marlow, a first-time novelist, has created a memorable protagonist in Philomena/Phillip, a late-bloomer if ever there was one, a performance artist and researcher in 2001 New York. 

I Love Taylor Mead and Gay Power: Taylor Mead Columns 1969–1970, Both Edited and Published by John Edward Heys by Bob Holman
Taylor Mead 01 Bomb 132

It’s been two years since Taylor Mead left us to take his role as the Jester Fool Poet of the Great Bohemia in the Sky, but he is still a very living presence on the Lower East Side. 

Philip Glass’s Words Without Music: A Memoir by Michael Coffey
Philip Glass 01 Bomb 132

Words Without Music is a sustained performance with fascinating scenes and a lucid text.