New York Live Arts presents

Marjani Forte
Nov 15-19


BOMB 128 Summer 2014

BOMB 128
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Interviews

John Ashbery by Adam Fitzgerald

“Roussel wrote the kind of French that students were instructed to write at the Lycée: grammatically correct and totally limpid and cold. I don’t know why it appealed to me so much. I don’t think I’m a cold person myself. Maybe that’s why.”

Tania Bruguera by Paul O'Neill
Bruguera1

“You could say that Arte Útil is anti-capitalist, because it is placed within another social ecology and is produced for another social class. It doesn’t belong in a society of heroes or saints; it is a practice for a society of the commons.”

Charlemagne Palestine by Steve Dalachinsky
Palestine Mg 3725

“I like flirting with disaster. I like terms that are open and provocative and unusual and evocative and we don’t know where things will be going next.”

Juan Uslé by Shirley Kaneda
Usle2

“I begin listening and recognizing silence, meditating until I hear the blood circulating, and then start following the beats, making marks, one by one, line by line, emptying myself until the entire surface of the canvas is covered.”

Giuliana Bruno by Sarah Oppenheimer
Anthony Mccall Long Film For Four Projectors

Navigating the concentric interiors of the Glass Pavilion at the Toledo Museum of Art, the building unfolds along a serpentine walkway. Through the museum’s glass walls, the view opens uninterrupted. 

Lola Arias by Elianna Kan

“One is constantly working over what happened and constructing the future based on the past. So there’s no way of saying now we’re done with the past and it’s time to look for our future. No, there’s a direct continuity between these things.”

Roxane Gay by John Freeman

A fear of alienating myself from approval by revealing my truest self … a fear of not being heard, being judged, being misunderstood … These things make me tremble.

Joe Sola by Stuart Horodner
Sola1

“So I had this idea to get an anesthesiologist to knock me out during an art fair, and I could just lie there, well dressed, as if I were out looking at art in this center of commerce, but having totally checked out.”

First Proof
Portfolio by Katherine Bradford
Katherine Bradford 01
Moon Over Quabbin by Michael Coffey

The woman is in Iowa now, I hear. She moved there with her husband shortly after, and now she sees.

Soft/Not-soft Doppelgänger (12 Meditations) by Eleni Sikelianos

The reflection between an event in time and the memory of that event: “something shimmers like a heat wave between them.” 

Zero (an excerpt) by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi

The day after the gallery visit, I awoke with a lingering headache, alarmed by the sound of the phone. 

Three Poems by Vincent Katz

LOTHIAN

it was a great rush
to confront solidity

And Then by Donald Breckenridge

Brian got up early that Saturday to do his laundry then tracked down a friend who owed him ten dollars and scored some crystal meth in the process. 

Three Poems by Kim Bendheim

CAUGHT

He spears me like a fish
on the spoke of pleasure,

Stormchasers by Sara Jaffe

In P__, we had a huge yellow kitchen. A garden. 

Editor's Choice
Paul Chan’s Selected Writings, 2000–2014 edited by George Baker and Eric Banks by Alan Gilbert
Paulchanf2

Chan is not an artist who also writes; he’s an artist and a writer.

Richard Barnett’s The Sick Rose: Disease and the Art of Medical Illustration by Andrew Bourne
Sickrose L0074348

With the landmark publication of De humani corporis fabrica in 1543, Vesalius may have forever linked human anatomy, at least pictorially, with the aesthetics of the sixteenth-century woodcut—its perfect draftsmanship, edifying gore, and rather ham-handed theatricality. 

The George Kuchar Reader, Edited by Andrew Lampert by Kalup Linzy
Kuchar Reader

When I began to read Andrew Lampert’s introduction to The George Kuchar Reader, the anxieties, fears, and dim career outlook I have often experienced, eased.

Philip Glahn’s Bertolt Brecht by Richard Foreman
Bertolt Brecht

While the now-accepted wisdom is that Bertolt Brecht was one of the major dramatists of the past century, this same acceptance often tends to obscure the most unique aspect of his work, namely: his struggle through the decades to find new ways to present his deep political and social commitment—not just in his subject matter, but, equally, in the formal strategies of his distinctive theatrical form.

Semiotext(e): 28 Pamphlets for the 2014 Whitney Biennial by Corina Copp
Semiotexte

We are not all Pierre Guyotat, writing of our capture and interrogation in Algerian solitary in 1962, our words and acts subject to violent retaliation, but maybe we’ve seen our own soul’s bifurcation.

Brenda Coultas’s The Tatters by Ammiel Alcalay
Coultas The Tatters

Dedicated to poet, journalist, and activist Brad Will, a friend killed while filming a street battle in Mexico in 2006, Brenda Coultas’s The Tatters summons powers too seldom called upon these days.

Critical Practices, INC. at the Whitney Biennial / “Supposium 2014” at MoMA by Mónica de la Torre​
Whitney Moma

Pythagoras taught behind a veil to avoid distracting his students with his bodily appearance, which he considered an impediment to their pursuit of pure knowledge. His voice was an acousmatic one—its origin could not be identified.

Artists on Artists

Mika Tajima by Kareem Estefan

To kick with sabots, to willfully destroy, especially for political advantage. The Brooklyn-based artist and musician Mika Tajima is something of a saboteur. 

Christine and Margaret Wertheim by Marianne Shaneen
Shaneen 1

Christine Wertheim’s recently released book mUtter-bAbel is gorgeously hyperbolic, a primordial pataphysics of text and drawings that explores relationships between babies, mothers, language, and “ugly archaic feelings and their troubling social effects.”

Ricardo Nicolayevsky by Luis Felipe Fabre
Nicholay 1

It’s hard to pin down exactly what happens with Lost Portraits, an almost mythical series of Super 8 and 16mm shorts—filmed between 1982–85 in Mexico City and New York—depicting Nicolayevsky’s young friends and peers while he was a film student at NYU.

Also

BOMB Specific by Matt Keegan & Kay Rosen

The following is excerpted from an ongoing physical mail exchange, started in 2009, between artists Matt Keegan & Kay Rosen.