MAR 23 & 24, 6PM 

New York Live Arts

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An Urban Palimpsest: Philadelphia: Finding the Hidden City by Thomas Devaney

Making urban history visible. 

Fragments as Form: Mary Robison’s Why Did I Ever by Lincoln Michel
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The great lost American fragment novel.

An Anxiety of Influence: on Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi’s Call Me Zebra by Michael Valinsky
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Writing as an intransitive catastrophe and the hyperbole of literature.

Getting Out of the Western Box: Dennis Tedlock’s The Olson Codex by Ammiel Alcalay
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Paying homage to poet Charles Olson’s “special view” of the Yucatán.

A Panacea for Anti-Intellectualism: Martin Amis’s The Rub of Time by Ryan Chapman
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A new collection of criticism and reportage considers Trump, Bellow, and the pleasures of close reading.

Alternative Visions: John Yau’s The Wild Children of William Blake by Rob Colvin
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Writing art history from the inside out. 

For People Like Us: on Denis Johnson’s The Largesse of the Sea Maiden by Lincoln Michel
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A posthumous collection cements the author’s reputation as a master of the short story.

Literary Architecture: Quinn Latimer’s Like a Woman: Essays, Readings, Poems by Sylvia Gindick

The solitude of the voice. 

Tuli Kupferberg’s YEAH by Michael Blair
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Yep, here I am to tell y’all about YEAHYEAH being YEAH the magazine, that turpentine “tonic in type for young and old,” mimeographed between 1961 and 1965 by Fugs founder, poet, and anarcho-sociologist of the Lower East Side Tuli Kupferberg.

Kate Briggs’s This Little Art by Carlos Fonseca
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Briggs delves into her experience translating Roland Barthes’s La Préparation du roman to offer us a poignant account of what this translation compulsion might be.

Myriam Gurba’s Mean by Lauren LeBlanc
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Myriam Gurba’s Mean is the latest in a tear of recent autofiction (including Rachel Cusk’s Transit and Barbara Browning’s The Gift) that employ the genre to showcase the complications of modern women’s lives.

Looking Back on 2017: Literature
Looking Back 2017 Literature

Featuring selections by Justin Taylor, Shelly Oria, Mary Walling Blackburn, Kevin Killian, Barry Schwabsky, John Freeman, and more.

Tragic Confluences: Anne Carson’s Translation of Euripides’ Bakkhai by Will Harrison
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Re-imagining antiquity and complicating gender binaries for the modern reader.

Nebulous Geography: On Renee Gladman’s Houses of Ravicka by J.W. McCormack
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The imagined city from Gladman’s Ravicka series is as elusive as human self-hood. 

Those Million Things: Sung Yim’s What About the Rest of Your Life by Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore
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Writing personal and generational trauma. 

Sacred Folly: on Romain Gary’s The Kites and Promise at Dawn by J.W. McCormack
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A rediscovered novel and memoir depict a character we are lucky to have on the page. In life he would mortify us.

Greed, Italian Style: on Nicola Lagioia’s Ferocity by Kristen Martin
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Corruption, capitalism, and death in Puglia.

Productive Creativity: On Janina Wellmann’s The Form of Becoming: Embryology and the Epistemology of Rhythm, 1760–1830 by Catherine Despont

Exploring the lost connection between aesthetics and science.

Teju Cole’s Blind Spot by Claire Lehmann
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Following loosely in the tradition of the book-length photo-essay yoking images to text in a documentary mode, Cole has gently torqued this form.

Paul Kingsnorth’s Beast by Tyler Curtis
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The Wake—Paul Kingsnorth’s 2014 debut novel, which chronicles the life of an Anglo-Saxon during the Norman Conquest—has since gained a disturbing resonance with the recent surge and codification of nationalism that is Brexit.

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