Art

3042 Articles
Sorted by
Issue 146: Jaque Fragua and Brad Kahlhamer
Bk The Four Hairs 2012 5 1

Two artists drawing from punk, graffiti, and traditional Native American aesthetics, talk about protest art and the notion of the “Post-Smithsonian delinquent.”

The Turning Look: T. J. Clark Interviewed by Ryan Meehan
Tj Clark1

Hope at the point of despair; doubt at the point of hope.

Ancestor from the Future: Allison Akootchook Warden Interviewed by Katherine Brewer Ball
Warden1

Iñupiaq futures, language, and the spaces between performance and installation. 

The Continuity of Substances: Jonathan Silver Interviewed (Part 3) by Michael Brenson
3 Jonathan Silver1

The sculptor discusses his work and its influences.

CHERRY RIVER, Where the Rivers Mix by Katherine Cooper
Mta Cherry River 0648

It’s rare that as a writer I am left speechless by a performance. Writing becomes like swimming for the first time: relearning how to breathe. What can abandonment by words afford a writer besides drowning? Perhaps a lesson in listening. 

The Polynesian Voyaging Society’s Hikianalia Journey to California by Julian Brave NoiseCat
Hikianalia 9 Callahan

On August 16, the Hikianalia, a seventy-two-foot dual-hulled Polynesian voyaging canoe from Hawaii set out across the Pacific for California, powered by the winds, tides, two solar-charged propellers (for emergencies), and a thirteen-person crew.

The Continuity of Substances: Jonathan Silver Interviewed (Part 2) by Michael Brenson
2 Jonathan Silver1

The sculptor discusses his work and its influences. 

The Continuity of Substances: Jonathan Silver Interviewed (Part 1) by Michael Brenson
1 Jonathan Silver1

The sculptor discusses his work and its influences.

Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment by Louis Bury
Natures Nation1

An exhibition looks at historical conceptions of nature in the United States. 

Sculpting the Uncanny: Julianne Swartz Interviewed by Mathilde Walker-Billaud
Swartz1

The artist on voice, intimacy, and the physicality of sound.

Looking Back: BOMB Contributors on Art in 2018
Samantha Wall

Featuring selections by Matthew Jeffrey Abrams, Emmanuel Iduma, Kaitlyn A. Kramer, Ashley Stull Meyers, and more.

Diasporic Notions: Lyle Ashton Harris Interviewed by Katy Diamond Hamer
Ashton Harris1

The mask as multiple levels of embodiment.

Ree Morton: The Plant That Heals May Also Poison by Olivia Gauthier
Ree Morton1

Rediscovering a “maverick” female artist from the ’70s

Experiencing a Museum Through Its Past: Liz Park Interviewed by Scott Turri
Ci Kerry James Marshall

The Carnegie International 57th Edition recalls past works and embraces new artists. 

Black, Feminist, Spiritual, and Alive: Cauleen Smith’s Give It or Leave It by Jareh Das
Cauleen Smith 1

Cauleen Smith tangles the past with figures from African American histories, Afrofuturism, Radical Jazz, and alternative futures.

Can a Painting Not Have Fun?: Caitlin Cherry Interviewed by Zoe Dubno
Two Factor Authentication Installation2

The New York-based artist discusses collaboration, deskilling, and life after the end of the world.

Issue #145:  МОЙ СЕРПУХОВ / My Serpukhov by Victoria Lomasko
01 Landscape

A bilingual excerpt from the Russian graphic journalist’s forthcoming memoir on her hometown of Serpukhov (translated by Bela Shayevich), exploring post-Soviet space and the closure of the village’s state printing press

End Page by ​Kameelah Janan Rasheed
2 40X50 1 Sintra Copy
Portfolio by Alejandro Luperca Morales
2  Desaparecen Detenido 1 2

In 2010, Mexican artist Alejandro Luperca Morales began rubber-erasing human remains out of the frequent crime-scene reports published by P.M., his local Juarez newspaper. Often behind police barricade tape, these ghostly voids resemble eddies of dust, bald patches of earth, or gauzy shrouds illuminated from within. Over the past eight years, Morales has collected a significant archive, performing this gesture on more than 500 images.

Las Nietas de Nonó by Pepón Osorio
Bb10 Las Nietas De Nono 30

Sisters Lydela and Michel Nonó conduct performative interventions at their art space/home in Puerto Rico, using improvisation to process family memories and trace the wounds of colonialism.

No more results to load.
Nothing found—try broadening your search.