Gary Indiana

32 Articles
Sorted by
I Can Give You Anything but Love: A Memoir by Gary Indiana

Things to remember better: Ferd Eggan entered my life in San Francisco in 1969, the year I dropped out of Berkeley. 

The Shanghai Gesture by Gary Indiana
Gary Indiana

In celebration of Small Press Month, BOMB Magazine presents a serialized audiobook of The Shanghai Gesture, as read by the novel’s author, Gary Indiana.

BOMB All-Star Reading at Park Lit by Patrick Dacey, Sally Dawidoff, Gary Indiana & Fiona Maazel

BOMB Magazine celebrating the publication of BOMB #104 and its all-new pull-out literary supplement, First Proof with Park Lit, one of NYC’s best annual summer reading series.

Excerpt from The Shanghai Gesture by Gary Indiana

Smith goosed the accelerator with his snake-skin espadrilles.

Daniel Harris’s The Rise and Fall of Gay Culture by Gary Indiana
Daniel Harris 01 Bomb 060

It’s a truly unexpected pleasure to find a first-rate writer explicating a subject that is not only sprawlingly large but exceptionally clouded by obfuscation, emotionalism, and political pieties.

Resentment: A Comedy by Gary Indiana

Seth blames his adventures later that night on the speed hit JD gave him in the car, but in reality he drank much more than he realized (he confesses as much) at Teddy Wade’s party, 

Rent Boy by Gary Indiana

I made the mistake of going there early the other day, get this, I walk in, and I’m, like, the only hustler.

Gus Van Sant by Gary Indiana
Van Sant 01

Gary Indiana talks to venerated filmmaker and writer Gus Van Sant, director of films such as My Own Private Idaho and Drugstore Cowboy, before the release of Even Cowgirls Get the Blues.

Emma Tennant by Gary Indiana
Untitled 1 Body

When she was 26, Emma Tennant published a novel called The Color of Rain under the pseudonym Catherine Aydy. The name and title were both arrived at by manipulations of a Ouija board.

Boat by Gary Indiana
Raymond Pettibon 01

Paul decided to shoot on the so-called witch island. It was saved for last because it would take all day, for only two or three shots. 

Diaries 1989–90 by Gary Indiana

Cookie died Friday. I saw Victoria Pedersen in the Korean deli near Simon’s place, I had gone over there to eat some Chinese take-out with Simon.

Gary Indiana by Max Blagg
Gary Indiana

“People will always recognize themselves, no matter what you write. You could write a complete fantasy and people would think you were writing about them. It’s always the case. I’m not too concerned about that, unless somebody sues me.”

Alexander Kluge by Gary Indiana
 Kluge 01

Filmmaker Alexander Kluge delves into the cultural significance of film and television with Gary Indiana in this 1989 conversation. A series of Kluge’s films is currently screening at Spectacle Theater in Brooklyn.

Shadow of Angels by Gary Indiana
Susan Grayson Bomb 01

In April he gave me two pictures that later acquired a mild notoriety.

Sandra Bernhard by Gary Indiana
Bernhard 01 Body

Sandra Bernhard collaborated with John Boskovitch to write her 1988 show Without You I’m Nothing. Sandra was inspired to develop material after two years traveling on the road with John and the outrageous situations they encountered.

Horse Crazy by Gary Indiana
Al Taylor Untitled 01 Bomb 23

One night, after taking a valium, I ask Gregory why he needs to hurt me. He says it isn’t him, but Bob. Bob? Yes, Bob, he insists.

Love Isn’t Living, Life Doesn’t Live by Gary Indiana
​Holt Quentel

One afternoon when I had cleared away every distraction, mailed out the phone bill and the rent check, written letters to Europe, tidied up my desk, and settled down at last to work on Burma, after weeks of inactivity, Victor called. 

Robert Mapplethorpe by Gary Indiana
Mapplethorpe 01

A discussion between long-time BOMB contributor Gary Indiana and the late Robert Mapplethorpe on the New York art scene of the late 1980s and the difficulties of intimacy, comfort and eroticism in photography and portraiture.

Borrowed Times  by Gary Indiana
Bomb 21 Turkle Body

I’m living in hell, Richard told me in the steam room. Victor’s so heavy.

You Tell Me and We’ll Both Know by Gary Indiana

Crowded blocks of retail markets and one-room shops, then a passage of high cross-shaped public housing flats. 

No more results to load.
Nothing found—try broadening your search.