Graciela Iturbide by Hank Hine

BOMB 70 Winter 2000
Bombcover 70 1024X1024

Discover MFA Programs in Art and Writing

Iturbide Graciela 01 Bomb 070

Graciela Iturbide, Untitled, black and white photograph. All images courtesy of the artist.

Plants

A garden is a proposition that there might be a difference between the inside and the out, between our little patch and the wide world. Can such a difference be?

In the garden, nature is augmented, shaped, shaded, amplified, restrained. See the spikes of agave tented with a net. The fine pixelation of the canopy’s gauzy web holds clouds and darkening sky. See the foam rebozo, belts of bundled papers, ropes.

There is, these photos seem to say, no nature. There is human nature. We see in all things the signature of our intervention; even in our seeing, itself.

These photos of plants by Graciela Iturbide are her response to the call of her friend, artist Francisco Toledo. Having saved the monastic compound surrounding the Basilica Santo Domingo in Oaxaca, Mexico from the adventures of real estate developers, Toledo drew in Iturbide to help accomplish the planting of its several acres with species indigenous to that place. Her photos celebrate the undertaking and evidence the procedures of the Miztec and Zapotec gardeners in establishing the plants. They are finely printed in limited numbers, with the technique of photogravure, which has been so important to the human catalog of the natural world.

—Hank Hine

Graciela Iturbide 01 Bomb 070

Graciela Iturbide, Untitled, black and white photograph.

Graciela Iturbide 02 Bomb 070 Sm

Graciela Iturbide, Untitled, black and white photograph.

Graciela Iturbide 03 Bomb 070 Sm

Graciela Iturbide, Untitled, black and white photograph.

Graciela Iturbide 04 Bomb 070 Sm

Graciela Iturbide, Untitled, black and white photograph.

Portfolio by Jungjin Lee
233659932 01052017 Jungjin Lee Bomb 01
Related
The Energy Between Words: Emmalea Russo Interviewed by Ariel Yelen
G Cover Small

The poet on the physicality of language, making a process to mess it up, and curiosity as optimism.

Steven Holl: Making Architecture by Michael Brod
Steven Holl1

An architect starts with watercolor.

Lisa Sanditz by Kanishka Raja
Sanditz Lisa 01

A landscape painter explores the “bright, exuberant, plastic toxicity” oozing from the colors of our contemporary environment.

Originally published in

BOMB 70, Winter 2000

Featuring interviews with Ruben Ortiz, Juan Manuel Echavarria, Susan Baca, Guillermo Cabrera Infante, Jose Cura, Adelia Prado, Ernesto Neto, Mayra Montero, Claribel Alegria, Francisco Toledo, and Juan Formell. 

Read the issue
Bombcover 70 1024X1024