Cruciform with Red Marks by John Torreano

BOMB 4 Fall 1982
004 Summer Fall 1982
Article 130 4  John Torreano

John Torreano, Cruciform with Red Marks, 1981, paint, glass jewels, and silicon glue on solid wood, 19½ × 12 inches. Photo by Delka. Courtesy of Hamilton Gallery.

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Oral History Project: Linda Goode Bryant by Rujeko Hockley
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“I was motivated to pursue a way to change the conditions that were causing Black artists I interfaced with every day to say, ‘They won’t let us, they won’t let us, they won’t let us.’ I got tired of hearing that, and I said, ‘Fuck them! Let’s start a gallery!’ So that’s how JAM got started. It was never about being included.”

—Linda Goode Bryant, “Recollections, Linda Goode Bryant” in Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power

Two Poems by Stephanie Ellis Schlaifer
14766483741 9Deecfccf3 O 1

All monuments commemorate the same / falsehood The gilt is genuine and we feel it right / at the surface of our discontent / Anger like so many lustrous mounts softens / in the rain  And stallions and generals must periodically be / re-gilded      recommitted to    as if / as an abiding law of man / Though    if we are honest    it is the law that fails us / along with what we can abide 

Maren Hassinger by Lowery Stokes Sims
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“Right, they weren’t paintings, they weren’t colorful, but I kept doing them because that’s what would come to me. I could have stopped, I suppose, but to me they seemed like good pieces and they were in line with my thinking. Artists do what they think is important to them in their life span. That’s what they’ve always done—Rembrandt or Van Gogh or Picasso. They did what they did because they thought it was important.”

Originally published in

BOMB 4, Fall 1982

Mary Heilmann & Ellen Phelan, Georgia Marsh, Paul Bowles, Michael McClard, and Duncan Hannah. Cover by Mary Heilmann.

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004 Summer Fall 1982