BOMB’s Biennial Fiction Contest

Home of the Bill T. Jones / Arnie Zane Company


Our fiction contest returns. We are pleased to announce this year’s judge is Sheila Heti, author of How Should a Person Be? and Ticknor.

The winner will receive a $1,000 prize and publication in the fall issue of BOMB Magazine’s literary supplement, First Proof. All submissions will be read anonymously.

Sheila Heti

Photo by Sylvia Plachy.

Submission Guidelines

  • Winner receives $1,000 and publication in BOMB Magazine.
  • Final Judge: Sheila Heti.
  • Submission period: May 1-31, 2015.
  • Reading Fee: $20. Includes a free one-year subscription to BOMB.
  • Manuscripts must be fewer than 5,000 words and consist of a single story.
  • Include a cover letter with name, address, email, phone number, and title of story; do not write a name on the actual manuscript, as all entries will be considered anonymously.
  • Non-anonymous manuscripts will be immediately disqualified.
  • Simultaneous submissions okay, but reading fee is not transferable.
  • Story must be previously unpublished.
  • Stories must be uploaded via Submittable.
  • Email firstproof@bombsite.com with any questions.

The winner will be announced on July 31, 2015.

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