Issue #145: Ann Hamilton and Audra Wolowiec

Reassembled fragments of texts and vocalizations invite audiences into the immersive installations of these two artists.

Issue #145:  МОЙ СЕРПУХОВ / My Serpukhov by Victoria Lomasko

A bilingual excerpt from the Russian graphic journalist’s forthcoming memoir on her hometown of Serpukhov (translated by Bela Shayevich), exploring post-Soviet space and the closure of the village’s state printing press

Divining the Boundaries of Light: Emily Johnson Interviewed by Ivan Talijancic

Performance and community. 

Sex as Backdrop: Christopher Zeischegg Interviewed by Chelsea Hodson
Chris Z

The writer on working in the porn industry, the theatricality of violence, and the mundanity of capitalism.

Ree Morton: The Plant That Heals May Also Poison by Olivia Gauthier
Ree Morton1

Rediscovering a “maverick” female artist from the ’70s

Sculpture Room: Joshua Rivkin Interviewed by Rachel Cohen
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The biographer on writing about a complicated artist, with a peopled life.

Experiencing a Museum Through Its Past: Liz Park Interviewed by Scott Turri
Ci Kerry James Marshall

The Carnegie International 57th Edition recalls past works and embraces new artists. 

BOMB 142, Winter 2018

Featuring interviews with Milford Graves, Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, Meredith Monk, Jim Hodges, Lucy Dodd, Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, Jlin, Cate Giordano, Don Mee Choi, Christian Hawkey, and Friederike Mayröcker.

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142 Cover Web
BOMB 143, Spring 2018

Featuring interviews with LaToya Ruby Frazier and Fred Moten, Sergio De La Pava, Nina Hoss, Barbara Hammer, Joseph Keckler, Lydia Ourahmane, Kaneza Schaal, Hank Willis Thomas and Kambui Olujimi, and Summer Wheat.

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Bomb #143
BOMB 144, Summer 2018

Featuring interviews with Chris Martin, Cy Gavin, Tauba Auerbach, Sam Hillmer, Amy Jenkins, Florian Meisenberg, John Akomfrah, Simone Forti, Ottessa Moshfegh, and Anna Moschovakis

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144 Cover
BOMB 145, Fall 2018

In the process of putting together each new issue of BOMB, we often come across distinct resonances between interviews—shared themes, creative preoccupations, and even specific phrases crop up time and again within otherwise disparate features. In these pages, artists discuss their expansive notions on collaboration. Their practices tend to split, reapportion, or redefine authorship, privileging process over individual intention and encouraging unique partnerships with spectators, local communities, film subjects, and one another. These willful acts of reaching out and beyond are as vital as ever, and worth emphasizing here.
—The Editors

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Canids in Orbit: Kurt Caswell Interviewed by Taylor Larsen How to Escape from the Postcolonial by Jack Palmer Motown Monuments by Cary Loren Desiree Akhavan by Steve Macfarlane Lisa Hoke by Betsy Sussler Suzanne Farrell by Emily Fragos Michael Winterbottom by Liza Béar Joan Tewkesbury by David Seidner Luisa Valenzuela by Linda Yablonsky Yuri Lyubimov by Leonardo Shapiro Sergio Fajardo y Giancarlo Mazzanti (spanish) Mixtape: The Dead C by Clinton Krute Ammiel Alcalay: Part I by Risa Kahn Anna Moschovakis by Jennifer Kabat Wong Kar-wai  by Han Ong Pablo Helguera by Kathleen MacQueen Oumou Sangare by Zoë Anglesey Lisa Dwan & Walter Asmus by Michael Coffey Stephen Mueller by Joe Fyfe Lydia Peelle by Gillian Welch

Oral History Project

BOMB's Oral History Project is dedicated to collecting, documenting, and preserving the stories of distinguished visual artists of the African Diaspora.

Kara Walker & Larry Walker
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“I would like to do more of that kind of thing: travel, spend some time in a place and really work from a different vantage point. I don’t know what will happen in my work from that, but I trust my ability to find the tools to find my way into my work. I think I will sit out in the woods more.”

Maren Hassinger by Lowery Stokes Sims
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“Right, they weren’t paintings, they weren’t colorful, but I kept doing them because that’s what would come to me. I could have stopped, I suppose, but to me they seemed like good pieces and they were in line with my thinking. Artists do what they think is important to them in their life span. That’s what they’ve always done—Rembrandt or Van Gogh or Picasso. They did what they did because they thought it was important.”

Wangechi Mutu by Deborah Willis
Mutu Oral History 09

“The collage works are going to be life-size. My work increased in scale when I realized that I wanted people to enter the worlds or to see them almost like dioramas— these places that they could be immersed into, with their own social structures and their eco-systems.”

Announcing BOMB’s 2018 Oral History Fellow 
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The Oral History Fellowship is a post-graduate editorial fellowship offered by BOMB Magazine, with a goal to organize and publish interviews by artists of the African Diaspora who are based in New York.