Does Abstraction Belong to White People? by Miguel Gutierrez

Thinking the politics of race in contemporary dance. 

Three Poems by Lily Blacksell

blink twice, because you’re in / love. It is springtime, the merry / etcetera, look ahead, where we’re going / there’s a clearing and in the clearing / stands a boxer who must have slipped / his collar on the path running through / the field. He is panting, drooling, is all white / except for the pink of his exceptions– / 

Issue #145 | The Faceless Plant: Sketch for Timothy Morton by Heidi Norton

In a Dark Time the Eye Begins to See: Michelle Memran Interviewed by Alix Lambert
2  Maria Irene Fornes And Filmmaker Michelle Memran In Havana Cuba 2004 Photo By Alison Forbes

The director of The Rest I Make Up reflects on the life and companionship of María Irene Fornés.

The Centre for Emotional Materiality by Roula Seikaly
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What role does technology play in helping or hindering our wellbeing?

An Individual Is Made of Many Parts: Tschabalala Self Interviewed by Sasha Bonét
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Space shapes bodies; bodies shape space. 

Volatile and Transitory: Babak Lakghomi Interviewed by Zach Davidson
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A novella of warranted paranoia. 

BOMB 142, Winter 2018

Featuring interviews with Milford Graves, Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, Meredith Monk, Jim Hodges, Lucy Dodd, Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, Jlin, Cate Giordano, Don Mee Choi, Christian Hawkey, and Friederike Mayröcker.

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142 Cover Web
BOMB 143, Spring 2018

Featuring interviews with LaToya Ruby Frazier and Fred Moten, Sergio De La Pava, Nina Hoss, Barbara Hammer, Joseph Keckler, Lydia Ourahmane, Kaneza Schaal, Hank Willis Thomas and Kambui Olujimi, and Summer Wheat.

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Bomb #143
BOMB 144, Summer 2018

Featuring interviews with Chris Martin, Cy Gavin, Tauba Auerbach, Sam Hillmer, Amy Jenkins, Florian Meisenberg, John Akomfrah, Simone Forti, Ottessa Moshfegh, and Anna Moschovakis

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144 Cover
BOMB 145, Fall 2018

In the process of putting together each new issue of BOMB, we often come across distinct resonances between interviews—shared themes, creative preoccupations, and even specific phrases crop up time and again within otherwise disparate features. In these pages, artists discuss their expansive notions on collaboration. Their practices tend to split, reapportion, or redefine authorship, privileging process over individual intention and encouraging unique partnerships with spectators, local communities, film subjects, and one another. These willful acts of reaching out and beyond are as vital as ever, and worth emphasizing here.
—The Editors

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Jessica Stockholder by Stephen Westfall Harmony Holiday by Farid Matuk Taylor Mead by Alf Young Jim Nutt & Gladys Nilsson by Richard Hull Heidi Norton and Michael Marder by Monica Westin BOMB on the Scene: Robert Greene by Richard J. Goldstein Joanne Greenbaum by Jeremy Sigler Power in Diversity: fierce pussy Interviewed by Alexandra Juhasz Sam Prekop & Zak Prekop Richard Serra by David Seidner Allen Ruppersberg by Cheryl Donegan Cate Le Bon by Andrew Aylward Junot Díaz by Edwidge Danticat “Come Into My Amazing Yard”: Brandon Downing The Feminine and the Bloodthirsty: Chase Berggrun Interviewed by Ruby Brunton Subtext: Kathmandu Poet In New York by Susie DeFord Brian Ulrich by Lynn Saville David Scott by Stuart Hall I Will Speak Daggers by Megan McDonald Walsh Billy Sullivan by Saul Ostrow

Oral History Project

BOMB's Oral History Project is dedicated to collecting, documenting, and preserving the stories of distinguished visual artists of the African Diaspora.

Kara Walker & Larry Walker
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“I would like to do more of that kind of thing: travel, spend some time in a place and really work from a different vantage point. I don’t know what will happen in my work from that, but I trust my ability to find the tools to find my way into my work. I think I will sit out in the woods more.”

Maren Hassinger by Lowery Stokes Sims
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“Right, they weren’t paintings, they weren’t colorful, but I kept doing them because that’s what would come to me. I could have stopped, I suppose, but to me they seemed like good pieces and they were in line with my thinking. Artists do what they think is important to them in their life span. That’s what they’ve always done—Rembrandt or Van Gogh or Picasso. They did what they did because they thought it was important.”

Wangechi Mutu by Deborah Willis
Mutu Oral History 09

“The collage works are going to be life-size. My work increased in scale when I realized that I wanted people to enter the worlds or to see them almost like dioramas— these places that they could be immersed into, with their own social structures and their eco-systems.”

Announcing BOMB’s 2018 Oral History Fellow 
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The Oral History Fellowship is a post-graduate editorial fellowship offered by BOMB Magazine, with a goal to organize and publish interviews by artists of the African Diaspora who are based in New York.