BOMB’s Biennial Fiction Contest

To Change the Shape of the Brain in the Heart: A Conversation by John James & Rob Schlegel

The poets on their latest collections, the texture of language, and work that pulls the rug from under us.

The Story of Our Lives Do Not Have Faces: Sally Wen Mao Interviewed by Anne Anlin Cheng

The poet on her new collection and how a person lost to history can survive in the imaginary possibilities of art.

Jamming Opposites Together: Anna Sew Hoy Interviewed by William J. Simmons
Anna Sew Hoy1

Painting that boils down shapes.

Oral History Project: Linda Goode Bryant by Rujeko Hockley
Linda And Yvonne

“I was motivated to pursue a way to change the conditions that were causing Black artists I interfaced with every day to say, ‘They won’t let us, they won’t let us, they won’t let us.’ I got tired of hearing that, and I said, ‘Fuck them! Let’s start a gallery!’ So that’s how JAM got started. It was never about being included.”

—Linda Goode Bryant, “Recollections, Linda Goode Bryant” in Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power

Living is Contagious: Aimee Herman Interviewed by Christina Quintana
9781941110683 Everything Grows Cover Finished 1600

The writer on her debut novel, Everything Grows, an epistolary exploration of finding community and coming out in the early ’90s.

Bomb 2019 Gala Evite

Join us for our 38th Anniversary Gala and Art Auction

BOMB 144, Summer 2018

Featuring interviews with Chris Martin, Cy Gavin, Tauba Auerbach, Sam Hillmer, Amy Jenkins, Florian Meisenberg, John Akomfrah, Simone Forti, Ottessa Moshfegh, and Anna Moschovakis

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BOMB 145, Fall 2018

In the process of putting together each new issue of BOMB, we often come across distinct resonances between interviews—shared themes, creative preoccupations, and even specific phrases crop up time and again within otherwise disparate features. In these pages, artists discuss their expansive notions on collaboration. Their practices tend to split, reapportion, or redefine authorship, privileging process over individual intention and encouraging unique partnerships with spectators, local communities, film subjects, and one another. These willful acts of reaching out and beyond are as vital as ever, and worth emphasizing here.

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BOMB 146, Winter 2019

Our winter issue is dedicated to this planet’s greatest resource: water. With contributions from Saskatchewan and the American Southwest to Iceland and Northern Europe, an array of voices are brought together here—artists and writers investigating water as site, sustenance, and symbol, along with those expressing alarm and calling for intervention.


Featuring interviews with Lauren Bon, Oscar Tuazon, Jaque Fragua, Brad Kahlhamer, Ruth Cuthand, Janaina Tschäpe, Jessica Grindstaff, Tomoko Sauvage, Cecilia Vicuña, and Alicia Kopf, as well as writing by Laura van den Berg, Natalie Diaz, Stefan Helmreich, and more.

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BOMB 147, Spring 2019

Featuring interviews with Young Joon Kwak, Kazuo Hara, Bill Jenkins, Ligia Lewis, William Basinski, Titus Kaphar, José Roberto Cea, and Barry Lopez.

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Yonder Stands Your Orphan by Craig Hubert Mixtape: Gary War by Nicholas Earhart Dubravka Ugrešić by Svetlana Boym Ned Sublette by Garnette Cadogan The Propeller Group by Diane Mehta Sex as Backdrop: Christopher Zeischegg Interviewed by Chelsea Hodson Circuits and Loops: Tom McCarthy & Margarita Gluzberg Neil Michael Hagerty by Gary Canino How Should a Person Be? Talking to Sheila Heti by Adam Robinson Trading Fours with Jason Moran Nick Cave by Lindzee Smith Francisco Goldman and Silvana Paternostro Art and Ecology: Mariel Villeré and Dylan Gauthier Interviewed by Louis Bury Darrell Larson by Rob Sullivan Mary Walling Blackburn by Natasha Marie Llorens Lola Arias by Elianna Kan Plastilina Mosh by Erasmo Guerra “Come Into My Amazing Yard”: Brandon Downing Jamming Opposites Together: Anna Sew Hoy Interviewed by William J. Simmons Paweł Althamer by Nell McClister

Highlights from the Oral History Project

BOMB's Oral History Project is dedicated to collecting, documenting, and preserving the stories of distinguished visual artists of the African Diaspora.

Oral History Project: Linda Goode Bryant by Rujeko Hockley
Linda And Yvonne

“I was motivated to pursue a way to change the conditions that were causing Black artists I interfaced with every day to say, ‘They won’t let us, they won’t let us, they won’t let us.’ I got tired of hearing that, and I said, ‘Fuck them! Let’s start a gallery!’ So that’s how JAM got started. It was never about being included.”

—Linda Goode Bryant, “Recollections, Linda Goode Bryant” in Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power

Maren Hassinger by Lowery Stokes Sims
Hassinger High Noon 2

“Right, they weren’t paintings, they weren’t colorful, but I kept doing them because that’s what would come to me. I could have stopped, I suppose, but to me they seemed like good pieces and they were in line with my thinking. Artists do what they think is important to them in their life span. That’s what they’ve always done—Rembrandt or Van Gogh or Picasso. They did what they did because they thought it was important.”

William T. Williams by Mona Hadler
William T Williams 01

“I didn’t want to paint figuratively. I didn’t want something that was overtly referencing the social issues around me, but I wanted to find a way to describe them. How do you internalize this? How do you make a form that forces a painting to be an experience that is not necessarily easy to see, handle, or look at?”

Kara Walker & Larry Walker
Walker 01

“I would like to do more of that kind of thing: travel, spend some time in a place and really work from a different vantage point. I don’t know what will happen in my work from that, but I trust my ability to find the tools to find my way into my work. I think I will sit out in the woods more.”