Finding a Common Language: Jenny Brockmann Interviewed by Danni Shen

An entanglement with various modes of knowledge production.

Life Before Death: John Bruce and Pawel Wojtasik Interviewed by Nicholas Elliott

The filmmakers take an unexpected approach to documenting people in the final stage of life.

Issue #147: Ligia Lewis by Catherine Damman

The recent conclusion of the choreographer’s trilogy, Water Will (in Melody), employs mime, gothic imagery, and a Grimm tale, to consider entanglements of nature, the feminine, and blackness.

From Trying Not to Feel to Feeling Everything: Juliet Escoria’s Juliet the Maniac by Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore
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A bipolar teen on her journey from self-immolation to self-actualization.

Studio Visit: Nancy Elsamanoudi by Naomi Falk
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Intuiting rather than calculating.

Artistry and Access: Sasha Wortzel Interviewed by Kevin Gotkin
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The possibilities of museum access.

Laker Gold by Kwame Opoku-Duku
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Laker gold is how Pops describes it. To Little Man, though, that motherfucker is yellow. Canary yellow and dirty. Little Man knows it’s a Westview Public Works truck, even though the WPW tag was zig-zagged over with black spray paint.

BOMB 144, Summer 2018

Featuring interviews with Chris Martin, Cy Gavin, Tauba Auerbach, Sam Hillmer, Amy Jenkins, Florian Meisenberg, John Akomfrah, Simone Forti, Ottessa Moshfegh, and Anna Moschovakis

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BOMB 145, Fall 2018

In the process of putting together each new issue of BOMB, we often come across distinct resonances between interviews—shared themes, creative preoccupations, and even specific phrases crop up time and again within otherwise disparate features. In these pages, artists discuss their expansive notions on collaboration. Their practices tend to split, reapportion, or redefine authorship, privileging process over individual intention and encouraging unique partnerships with spectators, local communities, film subjects, and one another. These willful acts of reaching out and beyond are as vital as ever, and worth emphasizing here.

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BOMB 146, Winter 2019

Our winter issue is dedicated to this planet’s greatest resource: water. With contributions from Saskatchewan and the American Southwest to Iceland and Northern Europe, an array of voices are brought together here—artists and writers investigating water as site, sustenance, and symbol, along with those expressing alarm and calling for intervention.


Featuring interviews with Lauren Bon, Oscar Tuazon, Jaque Fragua, Brad Kahlhamer, Ruth Cuthand, Janaina Tschäpe, Jessica Grindstaff, Tomoko Sauvage, Cecilia Vicuña, and Alicia Kopf, as well as writing by Laura van den Berg, Natalie Diaz, Stefan Helmreich, and more.

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BOMB 147, Spring 2019

Featuring interviews with Young Joon Kwak, Kazuo Hara, Bill Jenkins, Ligia Lewis, William Basinski, Titus Kaphar, José Roberto Cea, and Barry Lopez.

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Petah Coyne by Lynne Tillman You Have to Get Their Attention: An Interview with Rachel Lyon by Ryan Spencer Jasper Johns by Marjorie Welish Local Natives The Splits by Richard J. Goldstein Tom Hagerman Rocks by Ryan Spencer Kate Valk by David Salle & Sarah French Visionary Persistence by Frank Thurston Green Michael Ondaatje by Willem Dafoe Virginia Fields by Constance Cortez Nell Zink by Keith Gessen Christopher Cozier by Annie Paul Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin by Sabine Mirlesse Virtuosic Ass by Lauren Bakst Becky Johnston by Betsy Sussler Eduardo Machado by Stuart Spencer Sending Out the Signal: Swoon Interviewed by Katie Peyton Raimund Abraham by Carlos Brillembourg Matt Siber by Alec Quig Karim Aïnouz by Tânia Cypriano

Highlights from the Oral History Project

BOMB's Oral History Project is dedicated to collecting, documenting, and preserving the stories of distinguished visual artists of the African Diaspora.

Oral History Project: Linda Goode Bryant by Rujeko Hockley
Linda And Yvonne

“I was motivated to pursue a way to change the conditions that were causing Black artists I interfaced with every day to say, ‘They won’t let us, they won’t let us, they won’t let us.’ I got tired of hearing that, and I said, ‘Fuck them! Let’s start a gallery!’ So that’s how JAM got started. It was never about being included.”

—Linda Goode Bryant, “Recollections, Linda Goode Bryant” in Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power

Maren Hassinger by Lowery Stokes Sims
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“Right, they weren’t paintings, they weren’t colorful, but I kept doing them because that’s what would come to me. I could have stopped, I suppose, but to me they seemed like good pieces and they were in line with my thinking. Artists do what they think is important to them in their life span. That’s what they’ve always done—Rembrandt or Van Gogh or Picasso. They did what they did because they thought it was important.”

William T. Williams by Mona Hadler
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“I didn’t want to paint figuratively. I didn’t want something that was overtly referencing the social issues around me, but I wanted to find a way to describe them. How do you internalize this? How do you make a form that forces a painting to be an experience that is not necessarily easy to see, handle, or look at?”

Kara Walker & Larry Walker
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“I would like to do more of that kind of thing: travel, spend some time in a place and really work from a different vantage point. I don’t know what will happen in my work from that, but I trust my ability to find the tools to find my way into my work. I think I will sit out in the woods more.”