Discover MFA Programs in Art and Writing

Fiction as Revelation: Chigozie Obioma Interviewed by Xavier Navarro Aquino

The Man Booker finalist on telling a story from the perspective of a spirit and writing to expose historical truths.

What’s Going On (or Some Violence To Get Some Good): Ben Jones Interviewed by Jessica Lanay

Painting that works with politics and abstraction.

Theater as Convergence: Lucas Baisch Interviewed by Vanessa Thill

On deep listening and being alive inside a system.

Social Sculpture: Elias Sime Interviewed by Louis Bury
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Creating a space between humans and machines.

The Misadventures of Nuns by Tobias Carroll
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On Sylvia Townsend Warner’s The Corner That Held Them, a witty and subversive novel about life in a fourteenth century convent.

A Note from Founder and Editor in Chief Betsy Sussler
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Sustain BOMB with a tax-deductible gift in 2019!

Issue #150 Preview: Anthony Roth Costanzo by Justin Vivian Bond
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A look behind the scenes of Akhnaten, Philip Glass’s 1983 opera now playing at the Metropolitan Opera, in which the countertenor plays an ancient Egyptian pharaoh who defied gender conventions.

BOMB 146, Winter 2019

Our winter issue is dedicated to this planet’s greatest resource: water. With contributions from Saskatchewan and the American Southwest to Iceland and Northern Europe, an array of voices are brought together here—artists and writers investigating water as site, sustenance, and symbol, along with those expressing alarm and calling for intervention.


Featuring interviews with Lauren Bon, Oscar Tuazon, Jaque Fragua, Brad Kahlhamer, Ruth Cuthand, Janaina Tschäpe, Jessica Grindstaff, Tomoko Sauvage, Cecilia Vicuña, and Alicia Kopf, as well as writing by Laura van den Berg, Natalie Diaz, Stefan Helmreich, and more.

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BOMB 147, Spring 2019

Featuring interviews with Young Joon Kwak, Kazuo Hara, Bill Jenkins, Ligia Lewis, William Basinski, Titus Kaphar, José Roberto Cea, and Barry Lopez.

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BOMB 148, Summer 2019

Featuring interviews with Mary Weatherford, Nanfu Wang, Lee Quiñones, Venkatachalam Saravanan, Tyshawn Sorey, Ben Whishaw, Édouard Louis, Geovani Martins, Prageeta Sharma, and James Thomas Stevens.

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BOMB 149, Fall 2019

Featuring interviews with Korakrit Arunanondchai, Antoine Catala and Dan Graham, Atelier Bow-Wow, American Artist, Jeff Bliumis, James N. Kienitz Wilkins, Rion Amilcar Scott, and Carmen Giménez Smith.

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Deb Margolin by Lynne Tillman Beautiful Big Blue Beast by Jane Dickson Sara Wintz by Claire Wilcox Adrienne Kennedy by Suzan-Lori Parks Carl Simmons The Practice of Infinite Humility by Chris Wallace Daniel Alarcón and Alex Espinoza by Gabriela Jauregui Staring Back, Staring Out: An Interview with Jillian Weise by Jessie Male Alternative Explanations: Nick Drnaso Interviewed by ​Elena Goukassian Poetry Doula by Susie DeFord One Man Threesome Robert Greene by Klaus Kertess Paul Auster by Joseph Mallia Andrew Durbin by Jacob Forrest Severn Dannielle Tegeder by Annie Godfrey Larmon Richard Maxwell by John Kelsey Joanna Ruocco by Micaela Morrissette Fiona Maazel by Justin Taylor Jasper Johns by Marjorie Welish Zero Things: Liz Magor Interviewed by Lee Ann Norman

Oral History Project

The Oral History Project is dedicated to collecting, developing, and preserving the stories of distinguished visual artists of the African Diaspora.

Oral History Project: Janet Olivia Henry & Sana Musasama
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“When you’re an artist, you bring what you know, what you think, what you’ve experienced, your aesthetic, your ambition, and it doesn’t have to be conscious. In fact it shouldn’t be self-conscious. If the work isn’t speaking to you, if you’re not getting it from what you’re seeing, you’ve failed, and no amount of explanation is going to change that.” —Janet Olivia Henry


“Making our art is the purest thing we do. There are no hidden lies. My work is my truth as I have lived it.”—Sana Musasama


Linda Goode Bryant by Rujeko Hockley
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“I was motivated to pursue a way to change the conditions that were causing Black artists I interfaced with every day to say, ‘They won’t let us, they won’t let us, they won’t let us.’ I got tired of hearing that, and I said, ‘Fuck them! Let’s start a gallery!’ So that’s how JAM got started. It was never about being included.”

—Linda Goode Bryant, “Recollections, Linda Goode Bryant” in Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power

Remembering Edward Clark
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Clark talks to his friend and fellow painter, Jack Whitten, about growing up in Louisiana, coming of age in Chicago, heady days in Paris, and living in New York City when the abstract expressionists ruled.

Peter Bradley by Steve Cannon, Quincy Troupe & Cannon Hersey
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“I don’t want to mention names, but there are several black artists that would like to shoot me today because they weren’t in that show. Some of them are dead, but the ones that aren’t dead still give me a lot of bullshit every time I see them.”