Fellowships and Residencies Summer 2019

Our quarterly roundup of multidisciplinary fellowships, residencies, and prizes currently accepting applications.

Portfolio: Martin Wilner

Drawings and notes on relation.

Restaging Violence: Marcela Torres Interviewed by Jared Quinton

Performances that address the affliction of racism.

The Horror is What We Don’t Yet Know (and Maybe Never Will): Brian Evenson Interviewed by Rob Goyanes
Brian Evenson

The writer on his new short story collection, creating realistic characters that don’t always change, and how fatherhood has impacted his relationship to language.

Fluidity and Change: Lito Kattou Interviewed by Caroline Elbaor
Lito Kattou1

Sculpture that seeks to elude binaries.

Flag Wars The Right One1

BOMB presents a screening of Flag Wars, a documentary, by Linda Goode Bryant and Laura Poitras at UnionDocs.

To Be Expressed

BOMB and Press Play present a screening and interactive program with actress and filmmaker Adepero Oduye

BOMB 144, Summer 2018

Featuring interviews with Chris Martin, Cy Gavin, Tauba Auerbach, Sam Hillmer, Amy Jenkins, Florian Meisenberg, John Akomfrah, Simone Forti, Ottessa Moshfegh, and Anna Moschovakis

Read the issue
144 Cover
BOMB 145, Fall 2018

In the process of putting together each new issue of BOMB, we often come across distinct resonances between interviews—shared themes, creative preoccupations, and even specific phrases crop up time and again within otherwise disparate features. In these pages, artists discuss their expansive notions on collaboration. Their practices tend to split, reapportion, or redefine authorship, privileging process over individual intention and encouraging unique partnerships with spectators, local communities, film subjects, and one another. These willful acts of reaching out and beyond are as vital as ever, and worth emphasizing here.

Read the issue
Bomb 145 Nobarcode Small
BOMB 146, Winter 2019

Our winter issue is dedicated to this planet’s greatest resource: water. With contributions from Saskatchewan and the American Southwest to Iceland and Northern Europe, an array of voices are brought together here—artists and writers investigating water as site, sustenance, and symbol, along with those expressing alarm and calling for intervention.


Featuring interviews with Lauren Bon, Oscar Tuazon, Jaque Fragua, Brad Kahlhamer, Ruth Cuthand, Janaina Tschäpe, Jessica Grindstaff, Tomoko Sauvage, Cecilia Vicuña, and Alicia Kopf, as well as writing by Laura van den Berg, Natalie Diaz, Stefan Helmreich, and more.

Read the issue
146 Cover Nobarcode
BOMB 147, Spring 2019

Featuring interviews with Young Joon Kwak, Kazuo Hara, Bill Jenkins, Ligia Lewis, William Basinski, Titus Kaphar, José Roberto Cea, and Barry Lopez.

Read the issue
147 Cover No Barcodeweb
Subscribe now and get nearly 50% off the cover price.
Ieva Misevičiūtė by Melanie Bonajo Project Nim: James Marsh by Zachary Block Chris Abani by Colm Tóibín Pauline Boudry / Renate Lorenz by Risa Puleo David Levine by James N. Kienitz Wilkins Danielle Dutton & Richard Kraft Dark Days: Demian Fenton and Don Argott by Anya Jaremko-Greenwold Pablo Vargas Lugo by Rubén Gallo The Source Family by Jonathan Andrews Alma Guillermoprieto by Esther Allen K8 Hardy by Ariana Reines Gabriel Orozco by Carmen Boullosa Milka Djordjevich by Marissa Perel Tod Papageorge by Richard B. Woodward Meshell Ndegeocello by Marc Anthony Thompson Erin Markey by Katherine Cooper Marcia Douglas by Loretta Collins Klobah Ann Lauterbach by John Reed A.M. Homes  by Gregory Crewdson Subtext: Joanna Fuhrman, Funny Not Funny by Susie DeFord

Highlights from the Oral History Project

BOMB's Oral History Project is dedicated to collecting, documenting, and preserving the stories of distinguished visual artists of the African Diaspora.

Linda Goode Bryant by Rujeko Hockley
Linda And Yvonne

“I was motivated to pursue a way to change the conditions that were causing Black artists I interfaced with every day to say, ‘They won’t let us, they won’t let us, they won’t let us.’ I got tired of hearing that, and I said, ‘Fuck them! Let’s start a gallery!’ So that’s how JAM got started. It was never about being included.”

—Linda Goode Bryant, “Recollections, Linda Goode Bryant” in Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power

Maren Hassinger by Lowery Stokes Sims
Hassinger High Noon 2

“Right, they weren’t paintings, they weren’t colorful, but I kept doing them because that’s what would come to me. I could have stopped, I suppose, but to me they seemed like good pieces and they were in line with my thinking. Artists do what they think is important to them in their life span. That’s what they’ve always done—Rembrandt or Van Gogh or Picasso. They did what they did because they thought it was important.”

William T. Williams by Mona Hadler
William T Williams 01

“I didn’t want to paint figuratively. I didn’t want something that was overtly referencing the social issues around me, but I wanted to find a way to describe them. How do you internalize this? How do you make a form that forces a painting to be an experience that is not necessarily easy to see, handle, or look at?”

Kara Walker & Larry Walker
Walker 01

“I would like to do more of that kind of thing: travel, spend some time in a place and really work from a different vantage point. I don’t know what will happen in my work from that, but I trust my ability to find the tools to find my way into my work. I think I will sit out in the woods more.”