Bitter Is the Truth: Tarek Lakhrissi Interviewed by Laura Brown

Film, performance, and sculpture that imagine exorcism as liberation.

Issue #152: Nicolas Party by Jonathan Lee

Party creates vivid pastels and transformational installations that lure viewers deep into the backstories of his subjects.

Holding the Gaze: Ebony G. Patterson Interviewed by Lori DeGolyer

Using the visual seduction of installation and video to address systemic violence.

An Artist’s Guide to Herbs: Wild Lettuce by Harmony Holiday
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On the cannibalization of black pain and how we free ourselves from it.

Issue #152: Michael in Light Colors by Marie-Helene Bertino
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Pessimism is More Inclusive: Porochista Khakpour Interviewed by Myriam Gurba
Brown Album Burnt Orange

The writer on her new book Brown Album, personal essays, camp as armor, the hyperreal, and designing her own Barbie.

Issue #152: Note From the Editor
152 Cover

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BOMB 149, Fall 2019

Featuring interviews with Korakrit Arunanondchai, Antoine Catala and Dan Graham, Atelier Bow-Wow, American Artist, Jeff Bliumis, James N. Kienitz Wilkins, Rion Amilcar Scott, and Carmen Giménez Smith.

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bomb magazine fall 149
BOMB 150, Winter 2020

For our 150th issue, we have redesigned our flagship print magazine. This design reaffirms our mandate to deliver the artist’s voice, supporting the vital discourse that appears in BOMB with vivid imagery and innovative juxtapositions that encourage dialogue across the arts—from conversations between artists, writers, and performers to exciting literature. We present exchanges in their formative state: revelatory, fluid, and iconoclastic.


This issue features interviews with Bruce Pearson, Anthony Roth Costanzo, Jacolby Satterwhite, Cathy Park Hong, Christiane Jatahy, and Seth Price, as well as fiction from Amelia Gray, Deb Olin Unferth, and Jenny Wu, and poetry from Sawako Nakayasu, Andrei Monastyrski, and Bob Holman.

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BOMB 151, Spring 2020

This issue features interviews with Chitra Ganesh, Tania Cypriano, Charles Atlas, Netta Yerushalmy, Vi Khi Nao, Amani Al-Thuwaini, Andrea Hasler, and Bruce Boone, as well as fiction from Verónica Gerber Bicecci, Justin Taylor, Rebecca Dinerstein Knight, and Lee Relvas, and poetry from Shuzo Takiguchi and Bruce Boone.

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151 Cover No Barcode
BOMB 152, Summer 2020

Featuring interviews with Nicolas Party, Jenny Offill, Brenda Goodman, Amoako Boafo, Craig Taborn, Jibz Cameron, Rowan Ricardo Phillips, and Odili Donald Odita.

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152 Cover
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Paul Pfeiffer by Jennifer Gonzalez Alexander Chee by Nicholas Mancusi Alain Kirili by Saul Ostrow Kenneth Goldsmith by Marcus Boon Q&A with Jesse Ball by ​Litquake Mel Chin by Saul Ostrow Jeanne Silverthorne by Saul Ostrow Palmbomen by Gary Canino Michael Tetherow  by Ellen Phelan Vegetable Woman: Laurie Weeks by Jennifer Coates Amit Dutta by Shambhavi Kaul Mixtape: Gang Gang Dance by Luke Carr Brandon Downing’s “负心的人 (Fu Xin De Ren), 2009″ by Mónica de la Torre​ Robin Coste Lewis by Matthew Sharpe Comfort in Getting Lost: Elizabeth Geoghegan Interviewed by Allison Grimaldi-Donahue Chris Andrews by Will Heyward Isaac Mizrahi by Elizabeth Cannon Donald Antrim by Thomas Bolt Steve Erickson by James Mx Lane Trisha Low by Sarah Gerard

Oral History Project

Since 2014, BOMB’s Oral History Project has staged one-on-one interviews with New York City-based visual artists of African descent, conducted by curators, scholars, and cultural producers.

Betsy Sussler on the Oral History Project
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If artists are not given the time and space to tell their own story, others will do it for them.

Oral History Project: Janet Olivia Henry & Sana Musasama
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“When you’re an artist, you bring what you know, what you think, what you’ve experienced, your aesthetic, your ambition, and it doesn’t have to be conscious. In fact it shouldn’t be self-conscious. If the work isn’t speaking to you, if you’re not getting it from what you’re seeing, you’ve failed, and no amount of explanation is going to change that.” —Janet Olivia Henry


“Making our art is the purest thing we do. There are no hidden lies. My work is my truth as I have lived it.”—Sana Musasama


Oral History Project: Willie Cole by Nancy Princenthal
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“To me it was about energy, persistence, optimism, will, desire, and manifestation. I believed that everything I wanted was already in the world and that it was my job to be aware enough to see opportunity when it’s headed my way.”

Wangechi Mutu by Deborah Willis
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“The collage works are going to be life-size. My work increased in scale when I realized that I wanted people to enter the worlds or to see them almost like dioramas— these places that they could be immersed into, with their own social structures and their eco-systems.”