BOMB 58, Winter 1997

The cover of BOMB 58

Michael Ondaatje by Willem Dafoe, Billy Bob Thornton, Hilton Als, Oumou Sangare, Emmet Gowin by Sally Gall, Donald Antrim, Stuart Hall, Marjetica Portč, Miloš Foreman, and David Rabinowitch.

Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk

by Linda Yablonsky

Although you never talk about fight club, Linda Yablonsky has a few things to say about Chuck Palahniuk’s novel of the same name: specifically, that it’s “hypnotic, harrowing, and bitterly comic.”

High Lonesome by Barry Hannah

by Amy Hempel

Barry Hannah, who claims to find plots “confining,” builds the stories in his collection High Lonesome one glorious sentence at a time, drawing humor from the lowered expectations of his characters’ lives.

Old School Books

by Robert Polito

Old School Books, W.W. Norton’s black fiction rediscovery series, carefully resurrects the work of oft-neglected writers such as Chester Himes and Clarence Cooper.

Gerald Busby

by Craig Lucas

Gerald Busby’s exhausting resume encompasses everything from evangelist piano-playing to textbook salesmanship, but his compositions, such as Body Ode for Three Singers and Glass Eater, are enough to delight reviewer Craig Lucas.

David Rabinowitch

by David Carrier

Philosopher David Carrier has a special understanding for sculptor David Rabinowitch’s influences: Hume, Spinoza and Wittgenstein. Based on an interview, a text on philosophy, sculpture and Rabinowitch’s methodology.

Emmet Gowin

by Sally Gall

Emmet Gowin’s early works were family portraits; his later photographs, aerial shots of the American heartland, record the beauty and waste of the land. Photographer Sally Gall tracks Gowin’s amazing career.

Breaking the Waves

by Bette Gordon

In the Danish film Breaking the Waves, Lars von Trier’s heroine Bess turns promiscuous in an unusual plea for God’s pity for her paralyzed husband.

Ron Rifkin

by Jon Robin Baitz

Given Ron Rifkin’s emotionally deep being, its easy to see why Jon Robin Baitz wrote the lead character in The Substance of Fire with Rifkin in mind. The playwright and the actor intimately discuss their friendship and life in the theater.

Jonas Maron

by Allen Frame

Jonas Maron’s photographs of post-unification Germany in the ’90s echo pictures of post-war Germany in the ’50s, raising questions about the nature of future progress in a country with such a complicated past.

Billy Bob Thornton

by John Bowe

Noted for his roles (co-writer/actor) in 1992’s acclaimed One False Move, Billy Bob Thornton makes his debut behind the lens with Sling Blade. He talks with John Bowe about writing the script, playing the hero and directing the action.

Lee Friedlander

by Tina Barney

Lee Friedlander finds a new style of self-portraiture—square, black and white photographs—that he describes as “Zen Archery”: the artist placed at both ends of the camera.

Miloš Forman

by Liza Béar

Director Miloš Forman began making films in Communist Czechoslovakia. He and writer Liza Bear talk about his film, The People vs. Larry Flynt, and censorship in the United States.

David Craven: Painting Networks

by Saul Ostrow

Reviewer Saul Ostrow finds an unending list of juxtapositions in David Craven’s paintings: the formalist and the literary, the image and the word, the recognizable and the merely evocative.

Portfolio: Douglas Beube

by Amanda Means

This First Proof contains images from Beube’s 1995 photgraph Exodus with text by Amanda Means on the work. For copyright reasons this content is available in print only.

This First Proof contains the poems “Coronary Artist (2),” “Risk Signature,” and “Madame Narcissist.” For copyright reasons this content is available in print only.

This First Proof contains an excerpt from the novel My Drowning. For copyright reasons this content is available in print only.

This First Proof contains the poems “The Pair,” “Sealed,” and “The Painted Colt.” For copyright reasons this content is available in print only.

Hilton Als

by Coco Fusco

In his much awaited first book, The Women, Hilton Als spans autobiography, cultural theory and nonfiction essay. Artist Coco Fusco gets “the James Baldwin of the 21st century” to talk about confronting the silence.

BOMB 58
Winter 1997
The cover of BOMB 58