BOMB 107, Spring 2009

The cover of BOMB 107

Adam Bartos, A.M. Homes, Jacqueline Humphries, Cecily Brown, Eric Kraft, Andrei Codrescu, Roxy Paine, Mary Gaistkill, Matthew Buckingham, Pauline Oliveros, The Yes Men, Joyce Pensato . .

WEB EXTRA! Watch David Clarkson’s video Colony, in which a squadron of red ants explores NASA landscape imagery of Mars—an extension of the artist’s BOMB Specific piece in the current issue of BOMB.

Everything You See Is Real

by Ben Ehrenreich

Fiction for Driving Across America Listen to Ben Ehrenreich read his short story “Everything You See Is Real,” originally published in BOMB 107, the fourth installment in BOMB’s literary podcast series.

Bill Jacobson

by Ian Berry

This First Proof contains a portfolio of photographs from the series A Series of Human Decisions by Bill Jacobson with writing on the work by Ian Berry.

BOMB cofounder and editor-in-chief Betsy Sussler welcomes readers to BOMB’s 28th year in publication and debuts the magazine’s new design.

Lutz Bacher's SMOKE (Gets in Your Eyes)

by Ben Handzo

For those unfamiliar with Lutz Bacher’s work—or Lutz Bacher the person—her new artist’s book SMOKE (Gets In Your Eyes) recreates some of the many strange moments in the career and life of the Berkeley-based artist.

The Straits by Kristin Palm

by Mónica de la Torre

Mónica de la Torre on Kristin Palm’s first book of poems The Straits a rhapsody of Detroit that traverses time and subject seamlessly, encapsulating everything from the arrival of French settlers to the auto industry’s takeover of the city.

Jacqueline Humphries

by Cecily Brown

In her hometown of New Orleans, Humphries created silver and ghost paintings in an auto garage for the Prospect.1 Biennial. The artists on the beckoning mutability of Humphries’ paintings.

Eric Kraft

by Andrei Codrescu

Kraft’s new novel, Flying, tells the hilarious and digressive story of Peter Leroy, “birdboy of Babbington,” who as a teenager assembled an aerocycle in his garage. The authors on the Peter Leroy cycle. Alfred Jarry, and Twain’s Hucklberry Finn.

Roxy Paine

by Tod Williams

Paine and the architectural team discusses Maelstrom, the most recent of iconic stainless-steel tree installations, as well as his highly personal take on organic forms and machine-made art.

Adam Bartos

by A. M. Homes

Bartos’s photography reveals something the writer Homes calls, “history passing, when culture is fading, when time has stopped.” His new work is on view now at Gitterman Gallery in New York City.

With the publication of Don’t Cry, Gaitskill’s new book of short stories, she has become a ubiquitous interviewee—on which she remarks, “I dance around, make faces, and wildly pantomime in hopes of getting my meaning across.” Here she does.

Mickalene Thomas

by Kara Walker

An artists on artists text on African American Feminism Painter Mickalene Thomas by Artists Kara Walker accompanied by three paintings by Mickalene Thomas, the first titled Le Leçon d’amour.

Joyce Pensato

by Marcella Durand

Joyce Pensato starts with the most iconic cartoon figures—Mickey, Minnie, Daffy, Krazy, and Homer—but her representations of them couldn’t be further from their usual plastic media. Hew new work is up at Corbett vs. Dempsey through the end of November.

The Yes Men

by Steve Lambert

With cheap suits and utopian agendas, the Yes Men invade business conferences and the television newsroom posing as politicians and corporate spokesmen. It’s aigtprop for a new age, played out in real life

Pauline Oliveros

by Cory Arcangel

Oliveros is a perpetual pioneer of electronic music, the use of technology, telematics, and sonic awareness—or, as she terms it—Deep Listening.

Matthew Buckingham

by Josiah McElheny

Buckingham’s film-based projects focus more on our contemporary reading of historical events than on imagining an ultimately irretrievable past. Their aim: to engage viewers in actively creating the present.

BOMB 107
Spring 2009
The cover of BOMB 107