Daily Postings
literature : interview

Breanne Fahs

by Liz Kinnamon

Madness, SCUM Manifesto, and Valerie Solanas—history's most famous lipstick misandrist.

Breanne Fahs has written an impossible biography. She worked on Valerie Solanas: The Defiant Life of the Woman Who Wrote SCUM (and Shot Andy Warhol) (Feminist Press, 2014) for over ten years, traipsing across the United States to weave together Solanas's story from postcards, institutional records, zines, the memories of radical feminists and Warholites, and “discussions in cat-filled apartments.” Valerie was homeless for the majority of her life so writing the biography was like “pursuing the movements of an invisible wolf.” Who was the woman who wrote SCUM Manifesto—one of the most charged, prescient, and militant manifestos in feminist history? What happened to her? Fahs managed to gather unforetold reflections about Solanas from every angle, resulting in the gut-wrenching and electrifying story of a person whose assassination attempt against one man was a symbolic, global patricide: a mission to kill postmodern appropriation, capitalism, and male privilege.

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music : interview

Ariel Kalma

by Jefre Cantu-Ledesma

Harmony in chaos, and the eternal now.

Never one to eschew opportunity, French-born Ariel Kalma has been following serendipitous roads to productive musical and spiritual beginnings since the 1970s. Rarely remaining in one place for long, Ariel's nomadic existence led him to encounters with the Dagar Brothers in India, Pierre Henry's INA-GRM in France, Don Cherry and The Arica School in New York, and finally, to Australia where he currently resides with his family. From playing sax in 1960s Parisian rock 'n' roll and jazz bands, crashing in the catacombs of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in 1970s New York, or fashioning his own Dream House (despite having never experienced La Monte Young's MELA Foundation installation) in a tiny flat in Paris, Ariel's brush strokes across the canvas of experimental music are wide, deep, and textured. His harmonic trajectory has given rise to a vast catalog of cacophonous glee and psychedelic excursions devoid of pretense. As if guided by cosmic forces, Ariel's evolution continues to into the present.

A compilation of Ariel's archival work, An Evolutionary Music (Original Recordings: 1972 – 1979) was released by RVNG Intl. in late November, 2014. A collaborative record with Robert A.A. Lowe, also known as Lichens, was recently announced and is forthcoming from RVNG this spring.

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art : interview

Valentin Carron

by Clément Delépine

How to modernize your medium.

Carron was kind enough to give me a tour of his recent exhibition at 303 Gallery in New York, Music is a s-s-s-serious thing. The title borrows the words of the Romanian pianist Dinu Lipatti who, despite a very short career, was considered one of the most talented musicians of the 20th century. Carron’s first source of inspiration for this exhibition was an LP recorded by the pianist, which features abstract graphic design on the cover, though he eventually parted from any visual reference to it. Much like the sculptures he appropriates, Carron altered the quote with a stammer. A repetition of the consonant S, which alleviates the seriousness conveyed by Lipatti’s words.

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film : interview

Deborah Stratman

by Pamela Cohn

Sound, image, espionage, and methods of control.

Deborah Stratman displays great mastery at subtly interpreting the subconscious frequencies and amplitudes that give shape to our common experiences, illuminating the viewer through her distinctive representations of power, control, and belief systems. Working within a multiplicity of media from film, video, and audio work, to drawing, architecture, and sculptural projects, she has received Fulbright, Guggenheim and Creative Capital fellowships over the course of her career. For the last decade, she has taught in a multi-disciplinary arts program at the University of Illinois in Chicago.

One of five artists to receive the 2014 Herb Alpert Award in the Arts—an unrestricted prize of $75,000 given annually “to risk-taking mid-career artists … at a moment in their lives when they are poised to propel their art in new and unpredictable directions”—Stratman makes work that engages her perpetually inquisitive mind, a mind that asks a lot of complicated questions, ones to which she really never expects to receive answers. And if she does receive answers with too much facility, it’s likely she’ll decide it’s not worth pursuing after all.

The editing of her film and video work is distinctive, and—perhaps, oddly—reminds me quite a bit of the work of Armenian director, Artavazd Pelešjan, also a brilliant essayist and theorist, who creates highly poetic views of life on celluloid. Pelešjan is also known for developing a style of cinematographic perspective known as “distance montage,” and this is something that Stratman does with high proficiency, as well, particularly with sound, combining perceptions of depth with various visual entities on screen to sometimes uncanny, but always mysteriously moving, affect.

I met with Stratman most recently last October in the Czech Republic at the eighteenth edition of the Jihlava International Documentary Film Festival where she was to give a master class and also serve on one of the juries, a particularly intense task at this festival where jurors are expected to view seven to eight films a day in order to deliberate on as many as forty films in one competition. We managed to carve out a bit of time between her screenings for a quick bite of lunch at a deafeningly noisy café in the foyer of one of the cinemas. Stratman’s latest film, called Hacked Circuit, was also in competition in the Fascinations Section at Jihlava. It is dedicated to both Walter Murch and Edward Snowden and won the prize out of thirty-three other films in its category.

Hacked Circuit, a title that beautifully plays upon many ideas presented in the film, is a fifteen-minute piece shot in one take, with superbly realized camerawork by Norbert Shieh. Before we see the context within which the initial sounds we hear are embedded, footage of a mysterious location is accompanied by audio fragments from Francis Ford Coppola’s 1974 film, The Conversation, starring Gene Hackman, specifically the scene where he frantically searches and tears apart a room in order to uncover the “bug” he is convinced has been planted there to record his telephone calls. Stratman uses a Foley studio in the back streets of Los Angeles as her set, exploring violations of privacy by political powers while simultaneously illustrating the power inherent in the various illusions and conflations of our perceptions of sight and sound.

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art : portfolio

Portfolio

by Theresa Himmer

I began working on Parallel Memories while I was in Russia to develop a public art commission in a city called Perm, by the Ural Mountains. There I met Mikhail Nagaitsev, a Russian man about my age, who told me of his fond memories from early childhood in Czechoslovakia.

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literature : word choice

A Raven on the Snow

by Patricio Pron

That winter the city was full of ravens. They usually gathered in the parks, where they could be found in little groups of three or four, inspecting their surroundings with a wicked stare. If they noticed something shiny in the snow—a wrapper or a scrap of paper—they'd land on it, grabbing it with their beaks, and then spit it out in contempt. Sometimes the ravens would fight over the object, thereby sharing the confusion and disappointment their find created. Then, still united in some way by their defeat, they'd move away from each other slightly before going after the object again with little hops that were both ridiculous and threatening.

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literature : interview

Beau Rice

by Aiden Arata

Text messaging, parasexual literature, and psychiatry in drag.

I personally don’t know where relationships come from, but I suspect they are conceived in the gaps between our boundaries. Beau Rice’s Tex (Penny-Ante Editions, 2014) is an exploration of such borders and what connects them: a study in masculinity, language, and space in the form of 252 bound pages of text messages. Here Rice has archived eight months of an exclusively digital relationship with the diffident Matt G. It is rife with emoji, word play, and theory; it is interrupted by emails from friends, Craigslist hookups, and someone who wants insurance money. The book treats sex (and there is a lot of it) as obscene and vulnerable, often both at the same time. Ultimately, maybe, Rice’s archive speaks of desire: in love, in language. It is the grid-work that fills the gap. Tex’s appeal to desire is electronically contoured, taking shape as a set of sentient haikus:

So much of the stuff i
read is inspired and
motivated by intense
writer people meeting
aloof/absent men and
being shaken up by them

but it’s like the 21st century,
don’t they know how to
have textual intercourse?

I first met Beau a few years ago at the Jewel’s Catch One disco club in Los Angeles. Like a relationship comprised of text messages, Rice himself is a taut balance of glittering wit and self-aware anxiety. We chatted online about process, personality, eroticism, and Internet sex.

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art : interview

Tomi Ungerer

by Natalie Frank

"It’s so important to make your own little specks of peace around you. It’s a matter of being an idiot."

It was by way of the New York Drawing Center that I discovered Tomi Ungerer. After rabidly devouring all that I could get my hands on, I wondered why it was only later in life that I had found his work. The adults of my childhood had certainly played a cruel trick on me. I can't fully describe the way I felt looking through the diverse, wily, brutal, and tender graphic work of this artist, except to say that my skin chilled. His hand is one of complete freedom as well as control: his humorous depictions of animals feel more human than people beside you; the elegance of the renderings of bodies and politics in Babylon and in The Underground Sketchbook seduce and invade your mind; Fornicon titilates while admonishing us and our machines; and, then there are the children's books which bestow respect on children—those who need not be coddled by the un-realities of life. Ungerer himself and his work can be flirtatious, unflinching, and ruthless in satire; his drawings always lead you on a journey that is equal parts magic yet stinks of the real. I had the pleasure to speak with Ungerer at length by phone while he was in Strasbourg, and I in New York, where his first US retrospective opens at The Drawing Center on January 15. Claire Gilman has curated an exhibition representative of both his erotic works and his children's book illustrations, a vindication for an artist once banned in this country.

Ungerer has been recognized as a Commander of the French Order of Arts and Letters, a Chargé de Mission by the French Ministry of Education, Officer of the Legion d’Honneur, and was awarded the National Prize for Graphic Arts by the Ministry of Culture. He has worked passionately on behalf of Franco-German Relations, and with humanitarian operations, the French Red Cross and Amnesty International. Ungerer is the recipient of the Hans Christian Andersen Prize, the most prestigious children’s literature prize, as well as the European prize for Culture. He holds an ambassadorship for Childhood and Education by the Council of Europe for which he drafted the Declaration of Children’s Rights. The Tomi Ungerer Museum in Strasbourg opened with Ungerer's collection of over 1500 volumes and a stock of over 8000 drawings; it is unique and a first in French history that a government-funded museum has been established on behalf of a living artist.

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art : interview

Clive Phillpot

by Ashley McNelis

Expanding the medium of artists' books.

Clive Phillpot is a writer, editor and curator best known for his tenure as the head of the library of the Museum of Modern Art from 1977 to 1994. At MoMA he initiated and shaped the Artist Book Collection, one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of its kind. In 2013, a selection of his writings on artists’ books was published by JRP|Ringier: Booktrek: Selected Essays on Artists' Books (1972–2010) is a record of the medium from its beginnings to its current widespread and influential state. The essays include texts from his early “Feedback” column for Studio International, exhibition catalogue contributions, interviews with professionals, and essays on pivotal artists working in the field. Like the Artist Book Collection, Booktrek is a vital reference for anyone interested in the medium and its history. Like his career, our discussion at the Institute of Contemporary Art in London intersected with many of the notable people, institutions and circumstances significant to the origins and proliferation of artists' books as a medium.

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music : interview

Weyes Blood

by Tobias Carroll

Landscapes, lo-fi, and the uncanny.

The music made by Natalie Mering adds a sense of unease to the familiar. The Innocents, the second album from her project Weyes Blood, abounds with melodies that hearken back to folk-rock, if not to even earlier forms (sometimes by centuries—the way “Some Winters” unfolds is the definition of timeless). But she also keeps a foot in experimentation: Weyes Blood’s 2011 album The Outside Room featured six sprawling pieces that retained a melodic core but spliced in noisier elements. Her new album, The Innocents, was released by Mexican Summer in late 2014, and is an elaboration and expansion on those same approaches to song. This new record has a new directness and polish, and is even, occasionally, “rocking.”

Regardless of the context, Mering’s voice is a haunting one, channeling personal demons and summoning up landscapes familiar and foreign. Not long after watching Mering play a show with a four-piece band at the Brooklyn venue St. Vitus, I spoke to her about everything from Beat poets to jellyfish, East Coast suburbs to string arrangements. It was a wide-ranging chat, but given the depth and breadth of Mering’s music, that wasn’t at all surprising.

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film : interview

Gabriel Mascaro

by Giovanni Marchini Camia

Cemeteries and mansions by the sea.

After the documentaries High-Rise (2009) and Housemaids (2012), which explored the domestic realities of Brazil’s privileged urban class, Gabriel Mascaro turned his camera to the periphery with August Winds. Set in a remote coastal village in northern Brazil, the film expands the director’s artistic exploration of social divisions in his country. Working within a fictional framework for the first time, Mascaro uses the central story of a young couple—a local boy working on coconut fields and a girl from the city caring for her ailing grandmother and dreaming of becoming a tattoo artist—to initiate a meditation on life and death, with the coast’s rising sea level and its inherent destruction acting as a powerful metaphorical backdrop.

Although Mascaro includes himself in the role of a wind researcher whose arrival catalyzes the protagonists’ existential confusion, the film is uninterested in building a strong narrative. Rather, it is a careful observation of mood made up of a collection of snippets from life in the village, largely held in static shots that embed the characters in the setting’s sumptuous nature. Short, fragmented conversations are interspersed with gorgeous, effortlessly evocative images: the girl tanning supine on a fishing boat out at sea in front of a perfectly limpid horizon; the couple entwined in a post-coital embrace on top of a trailer full of green, freshly-picked coconuts; a cemetery on the beach, its graves eroded by the constant lapping of the waves. The result is beautiful, languid, and thoroughly melancholic.

August Winds was one of the finds at this year’s Locarno Film Festival, earning Mascaro a Special Mention at the awards ceremony. I spoke with the thirty-one-year-old director during the festival and he revealed how reality had dictated the direction of the film’s fiction before discussing his interests and principles as a filmmaker navigating the threshold between reality and fiction.

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art : interview

Tamar Ettun

by Naomi Lev

A live conversation about performance, adventure, and objects.

As part of an ongoing series hosted by Independent Curators International (ICI), I invite artists to discuss their work in an intimate environment. These talks are a continuation of a larger series of conversations and panels I’ve been initiating with artists from around the globe. Here in New York, the talks focus on Israeli art and artists. These particular conversations aim to explore the artists’ work in relation to place and time. While considering their origins and background, these artists react and examine possibilities of reshaping political, religious, and social structures. The series of articles began with the study of Ohad Meromi’s practice and will continues by revisiting Tamar Ettun’s and Dana Levy's works, as well as proposing a theoretical curatorial vision of the artists’ works as a whole.

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literature : word choice
music : interview

Peter Jefferies

by Tobias Carroll

A return to live performance after a decade-long absence.

This interview was supposed to happen very differently. News came earlier this year that the New Zealand-based musician Peter Jefferies would be playing his first shows in the United States in twenty years. A short tour was announced, and I bought my ticket to see him at Brooklyn’s ISSUE Project Room. That Jefferies was playing out wasn’t a complete shock: last year, De Stijl reissued his 1991 album Last Great Challenge For a Dull World. That was followed, earlier this year, by Superior Viaduct re-releasing his second album, 1994’s Electricity. A few days before the Issue Project Room show, however, word came that visa issues had prompted the cancellation of Jefferies’s tour, and instead we conducted this interview via email over the course of several weeks.

The attraction of Jefferies’s music comes from the way in which it moves from contrast to contrast. Some of his songs evoke a stark sense of melancholy; others arrive at a hard-won sense of mystery and revelation. His unpredictability and his penchant for dense, allusive lyrics allow make for a sound that eludes easy comparisons. Though some have offered up comparisons to the likes of John Cale and Nick Drake, Jefferies’s iconoclasm ultimately means that he sounds little like anyone save himself. Thankfully, through these reissues, an entirely new generation of listeners will be able to learn exactly what that means.

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film : interview

Bruno Dumont

by Nicholas Elliott

"Chiaroscuro levels of thought."

When French-German public television channel Arte announced in 2013 that it had commissioned Bruno Dumont to write and direct Li’l Quinquin, a comedic mini-series featuring children and a police investigation, many had to double-check their calendars to make sure it wasn’t April Fool’s Day. Known to film lovers for his use of non-professional actors in enigmatic stories juxtaposing the material and the spiritual, Dumont did not seem like the go-to guy for televised entertainment. Yet upon delivery, Li’l Quinquin is beyond what anyone except Dumont could have imagined: a riotously funny, occasionally slapstick comedy that remains utterly faithful to the vision that appeared wholly realized in Dumont’s first feature The Life of Jesus (1997) and has stayed the course through the six features that followed.

With Li’l Quinquin, Dumont returns to the grey skies and muddy earth of his native north of France to follow local Police Captain van der Weyden and his assistant Carpentier as they investigate an accumulation of grotesque murders before the eyes of local kid Li’l Quinquin, his girlfriend Eve, and his gang of friends. As played by non-professional actor Bernard Pruvost, Captain van der Weyden is one of the great comedic characters of recent years, with unpredictably rolling eyes, herky-jerky facial expressions, wild metaphors, and a walk to put Monty Python to shame. Yet in a way that is unique to Dumont’s cinema, van der Weyden also seems touched with a greater knowledge that brings him back again and again to the farm Li’l Quinquin inhabits with his parents and disabled uncle Dany.

A declared atheist, Dumont has always explored issues of good and evil, filming violence and sex acts, newspaper sociology and miracles with the same ambiguous gaze. The comedy in Li’l Quinquin makes you giddy with pleasure, but leads you into that thought-provoking, dangerous zone where you have to check if you are laughing with the characters or at them—or perhaps if they are laughing at you. Li’l Quinquin is sui generis. It feels like nothing if not a Bruno Dumont movie, though anyone who enjoyed the knotting of laughter and the macabre in Twin Peaks will want to see it.

I spoke to Dumont in New York, a few days before his film had its US premiere at the 52nd New York Film Festival and several weeks after the first of the four episodes of Li’l Quinquin attracted 1.5 million viewers on its initial French broadcast, a record for the channel’s original programming. Li’l Quinquin opens theatrically in New York in January 2015.

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art : interview

Gary Simmons

by Jodie Bass

Building a mutable sound system with found materials.

Gary Simmons is a contemporary artist, teacher, collaborator, and proud father of one. He was formally trained in painting, but his body of work interrogates notions of race, pop culture, social stereotypes, and politics through a variety of mixed media. After twenty-five years of art making, his work has been acquired by a host of major public art institutions including the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Museum of Contemporary Art, Museum of Modern Art, The Studio Museum of Harlem, and the Whitney Museum of Art. Simmons’ was born and raised in New York, where he currently resides. He completed graduate studies in Los Angeles.

I caught up with him at the site of his current show in the Treme, as participant of the biennial Prospect.3, the afternoon before the performance with the hip-hop artist Beans (Robert Edward Stewart II), a long time friend. This is Simmons’ first experience working in New Orleans.

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literature : interview

Dolan Morgan

by J. T. Price

Freedom, negation, and marine zoology.

Goats will arrive. Goats will disappear. That’s the premise, in short, of Dolan Morgan’s “Infestation,” the story leading off his debut collection, That’s When the Knives Come Down (Aforementioned Productions, 2014). 

Further along, another story, “Euclid’s Postulates,” reads: “I can’t help but assume the words are merely decorative here, festooning the empty belief that a narrative ripples beneath the facts. Something about space, about shape, about us.”

“Content” is what the business side calls the work of writers—you know, the words that fill the empty space where a book would go. Morgan’s fictions exist knowingly in that interstitial gap between notion and accomplished fact. Actually, they thrive there.

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art : portfolio
art : portfolio
looking back

Looking Back On 2014 #6

Selections by Mónica de la Torre, Matias Piñeiro, Hannah Holden, Sabine Russ, and Lisa Robertson.

As 2014 comes to a close, BOMB's contributors have a look back and report on a few highlights from their own reading, listening, and viewing experiences—books, albums, exhibitions, plays, performances, concerts, lectures, places, objects, really anything striking encountered over the course of the last eleven months or so. This is the sixth of several installments.

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film : interview

Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardenne

by Liza Béar

The master filmmakers on blending the political and the personal in their new film.

It was a rare privilege and fascinating experience to speak with Belgian filmmaking brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne during the screening of Two Days One Night at the 52nd New York Film Festival. They are auteurs par excellence, keeping tight reins over every aspect of their oeuvre—script, production and mise-en-scene. Their tightly-wound and intensely humanistic films, mostly direct but powerful stories about young people from economically disadvantaged backgrounds, have won two Palme d’Or at Cannes for Rosetta (1999)—along with Best Actress for Emilie Dequenne—and The Child (2005). In addition, Olivier Gourmet was named Best Actor for his role in The Son (2002), and the brothers won Best Screenplay for Lorna’s Silence (2008)—a well-deserved track record for low-budget filmmakers.

Typically working with new or non-professional actors, Two Days One Night is their first film to feature a noted international star, Marion Cotillard, as Sandra, a working mother just fired from a solar energy factory. A new management scam has placed the onus of downsizing on workers, who are offered a bonus if they vote to operate with one less employee, resulting in Sandra’s dismissal. While, in a very different way, unemployment was also the focus of Rosetta, the Dardennes break-out film—it reportedly led to the passing of a labor bill, Rosetta’s Law to protect young people—Two Days One Night addresses the issue of worker solidarity in a toxically competitive world.

In the following interview, the Dardennes discuss their documentary background, modus operandi, and the new film’s genesis. Two Days One Night opens theatrically on December 24.

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looking back

Looking Back On 2014 #5

Selections by Deana Lawson, C. Spencer Yeh, Andrew Bourne, Orit Gat, Clinton Krute, and Brian Evenson.

As 2014 comes to a close, BOMB's contributors have a look back and report on a few highlights from their own reading, listening, and viewing experiences—books, albums, exhibitions, plays, performances, concerts, lectures, places, objects, really anything striking encountered over the course of the last eleven months or so. This is the fifth of several installments.

 

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art : interview

Neil Greenberg & Will Corwin

A discussion of urbanism and Staten Island, cartography, and monumental sculpture’s place in modern society.

The Great Richmond is collaboration between the cartographer Neil Greenberg and the sculptor Will Corwin. The two were introduced by Monica Valenzuela, the Director of Development and Community Programming at Staten Island Arts, after both independently proposed projects focusing on the future of the borough via abstract methodology—Greenberg through imaginary maps and Corwin via interactive sculpture. The simplest means of collaborating turned out to be Greenberg visiting New York for several weeks at a time and camping out on Corwin’s couch. They made field trips to the island, wandered its streets and researched its history at the archives in the basement at Snug Harbor. Two years later, the result is a game-based and crowd-sourced sculpture incorporating many ideas from previous projects. For Greenberg it references imaginary urban manifestations and interventions such as Fake Omaha and Freshwater Metro Transit, and for Corwin it is another iteration of pseudo-randomly generated sculpture such as the Clocktower Chess Match.

The Great Richmond is an interactive project that will draw its momentum from the 65,000 or so tourists and Staten Islanders who wander into the Staten Island Arts Culture Lounge at the Staten Island Ferry Terminal and are willing to interact with the piece. The rules are simple: choose two game tokens from the storage shelves and place them on any of the four color-coded tables. There are eight varieties of token, cast-plaster sculptures approximately a cubic foot in size, representing different facets of the island: infrastructure, history and culture, architectural fabric (retail and residential, government institutions, contemporary culture, and connectivity with the rest of the boroughs), and agrarian aspirations. The four tables represent four visions for the island—a return to an agrarian utopia, secession, and increased suburban or urban fabric. The possible outcomes of visitors’ choices are concretized in Greenberg’s cycle of four fantasy maps of the island, while Corwin’s contribution lies in the tokens and shelving matrix. [ Read More ]

looking back

Looking Back On 2014 #4

Selections by Kate Valk, Andrew Lampert, Tan Lin, Mary-Ann Monforton, and Ryan Chapman.

As 2014 comes to a close, BOMB's contributors have a look back and report on a few highlights from their own reading, listening, and viewing experiences—books, albums, exhibitions, plays, performances, concerts, lectures, places, objects, really anything striking encountered over the course of the last eleven months or so. This is the fourth of several installments.

 

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music : interview

Ariel Pink

by Gary Canino

Chaotic performances, live recordings, and Generation Tween.

Ariel Pink’s unpredictable career continues to go down the rabbit hole. This time around, if he’s not under attack (again) for statements mocking Madonna and Grimes, he’s appearing on Fox News, or collaborating with the controversial and questionable Azealia Banks, and his recent “Tantalizing Tinsel Town Takeover” of LA featured nail painting, donuts, and limousines—all pink. In 2014, Pink is somewhere between the Fool card, Einstein, and Yahoo Serious.

Three quarters of the way through Ariel Pink’s overstuffed, sprawling, tasteless, and brilliant double album Pom Pom, there’s an already infamous skit about a grandfather taking his grandson to a strip club. Almost six minutes of Animotion meets The Human League meets Rodney Dangerfield give way to the crude skit interlude. It’s at the end of Side N (Sides P, I, N, and K, correlate to 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively), and it’s only relieved by the dreamier Side K, three longer dreamier songs that send off a classic double album. K contains the highlight “Picture Me Gone,” which manages to encapsulate the omnipotent feeling of FOMO while also mocking the times that have created the phrase. We discussed the ugly nature of performing, his method of creating an album, and how recording is a rip-off.

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